Israel researcher: Elusive Biblical blue found

Dec 31, 2013
This undated photograph released by the Israel's Antiquities Authority Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2013, shows a nearly 2,000-year old textile that appears to contain a mysterious blue color described in the Bible, one of the few remnants of the ancient color ever discovered. Researchers and rabbis have long searched for the enigmatic color, called tekhelet in Hebrew. The Bible commands Jews to wear a blue fringe on their garments, but the dye was lost in antiquity. (AP Photo/Clara Amit, Israel Antiquities Authority, HOPD)

An Israeli researcher says she has identified a nearly 2,000-year old textile that may contain a mysterious blue dye described in the Bible, one of the few remnants of the ancient color ever found.

Naama Sukenik of Israel's Antiquities Authority said Tuesday that recent examination of a small woolen discovered in the 1950s found that the textile was colored with a from the Murex trunculus, a snail researchers believe was the source of the Biblical blue.

Researchers and rabbis have long searched for the enigmatic color, called tekhelet in Hebrew. The Bible commands Jews to wear a blue fringe on their garments, but the dye was lost in antiquity.

Sukenik examined the textile for a doctorate at Bar-Ilan University and published the finding at a Jerusalem conference Monday.

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ugosugo
1 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2013
Finally, I can sleep again!
This elusiveness was driving me crazy!
God bless
Returners
2 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2013
I'll be honest, I'm a believer and I don't give to whits about it either.

It simply does not matter for any number of reasons.

For everyone, especially blood descendants of "Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob," or whoever the original patriarchs were or might have been, If God actually cared about the color of people's hems on their garments, he would have personally done something to resolve the problem long ago, and the formula never would have been lost, for example.

For Christians, it does not matter, because it is taught by the only authoritative sources we have, which is the authors of the Bible plus a few independent witnesses, that all of those things, such as clothing laws and restricted foods, etc, were merely symbolic, and have no inherent moral or spiritual value. They may be "good" things in and of themselves, but they contribute nothing to salvation or sanctification, therefore there is no moral reason to keep such traditions alive, other than pure historical interest.
NickFun
not rated yet Dec 31, 2013
Asian people have been dying blue fabrics from indigo for thousands of years.
Telekinetic
not rated yet Dec 31, 2013
"They may be "good" things in and of themselves, but they contribute nothing to salvation or sanctification, therefore there is no moral reason to keep such traditions alive, other than pure historical interest."- Returners

Stunningly presumptuous for you to say, since Christianity is not the only religion in the world. Dietary laws of the day kept people from dying of disease by avoiding the flesh of animals or mollusks that wallowed in excrement. I wouldn't eat clams that were raised in waters where a sewage pipe hung, which is the way most ancient cities were designed. Preserving one's physical well-being is not symbolic.

Sinister1812
not rated yet Dec 31, 2013
I wonder what happened to that "Noah's Ark" they found in Turkey. Never did believe it though.
jlevyellow
3.7 / 5 (3) Jan 01, 2014
History is the first victim of our advanced technology, but historical influence never disappears. As in the study of epigenetics, we find that history continues to affect thinking and effect behavior. Our seven day week is Biblical, as are most of our tort laws. Altruism extended past our immediate family based partially upon Biblical influences. Unified field theory got its start in monotheism. Language forms of Biblical origin continue to affect our thinking. It is just nice to know that all these influences that do not rise to consciousness on a daily basis are recognized and recorded in sources that can be consulted by those who are interested and have not been destroyed by those of a depressed nature who feel that nothing at all is important.
scuzzmonster
5 / 5 (1) Jan 02, 2014
History is the first victim of our advanced technology.


I'm hoping it's the opposite and that we'll be able to both record and understand it better.
davidivad
not rated yet Jan 02, 2014
that's awesome.
plaasjaapie
not rated yet Jan 05, 2014

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