Image: Astronaut Mike Hopkins on Dec. 24 spacewalk

December 29, 2013
Credit: NASA

On Dec. 24, 2013, NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 Flight Engineer, participates in the second of two spacewalks, spread over a four-day period, which were designed to allow the crew to change out a degraded pump module on the exterior of the Earth-orbiting International Space Station.

He was joined on both spacewalks by NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, whose image shows up in Hopkins' helmet visor.

The pump module controls the flow of ammonia through cooling loops and radiators outside the , and, combined with water-based cooling loops inside the station, removes excess heat into the vacuum of space.

Explore further: NASA: Cooling pump on space station shuts down

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