German court raises doubts about porn piracy case

Dec 20, 2013

A regional court in Germany says it may have slipped up in a case that saw thousands of Internet users receive copyright infringement claims for watching pornography online.

The Cologne court says it examined complaints from dozens of people who received warning letters from a Swiss-based company demanding €250 ($340) for allegedly watching pirated porn on a video streaming website.

Legal experts say the court should never have granted The Archive AG's request to identify the users, because it failed to establish that they had breached German copyright law.

The court said in a statement Friday that the complaints had raised "considerable" doubts about the legal procedure, though a final decision isn't expected until January.

Explore further: Hotfile ordered to pay $80M in copyright suit

4.7 /5 (3 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Court dismisses Nokia patent claims against HTC

Mar 09, 2013

Taiwan's top smartphone maker HTC said on Saturday a German court had dismissed two patent infringement complaints brought against the company by Finnish phone giant Nokia.

Recommended for you

Instagram photo-sharing service goes down

Apr 12, 2014

Popular photo-sharing site Instagram was not working Saturday, as frustrated users quickly turned to social network Twitter and other web sites to share their complaints.

Authors Guild asks US court to rule against Google

Apr 11, 2014

The Authors Guild says that Google Inc. is stealing business from retailers and has asked a New York federal appeals court to find that the Internet giant is violating copyright laws with its massive book digitization project.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

kotyto
not rated yet Dec 21, 2013
An incentive to use anonymous browsing such as TOR.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Dec 21, 2013
}An incentive to use anonymous browsing such as TOR.

Doesn't help, since they got the IP addresses via court order directly from the ISP (Deutsche Telekom)
I.e.the last leg of the chain of servers.

TOR only works for obfuscation where you're originating from if you're at the other end (at the website's server) and try to figure out who's accessing it. And even then only against someone with not much resources (read: maybe the site's IT department)

There are ways to still track you through TOR (Bad apple attacks, end-to-end analysis, ... ) these require a bit of skill/resources but not unfeasably much so. In the latter case you need a lot of timestamped data and some simple statistical analysis tools. In the former you need to inject your own server into the TOR system - which isn't particularly hard to do.

More news stories

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.

ESO image: A study in scarlet

This new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that ...

First direct observations of excitons in motion achieved

A quasiparticle called an exciton—responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits—has been understood theoretically for decades. But exciton movement within ...

Warm US West, cold East: A 4,000-year pattern

Last winter's curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, ...