Feds kill 26 barred owls to help spotted owl

December 20, 2013 by Jeff Barnard
This June 7, 2011 file photo shows a barred owl at the Miami Science Museum in Miami. An experiment to see if killing invasive barred owls will help the threatened Northern spotted owl reverse its decline toward extinction is underway in the forests of Northern California. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Friday, Dec. 20, 2013, that specially trained biologists have shot 26 barred owls in a study area on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation located northeast of Arcata, Calif. They plan to remove as many as 118. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

An experiment to see if killing invasive barred owls will help the threatened northern spotted owl reverse its decline toward extinction is underway in the forests of Northern California.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Friday that specially trained biologists have shot 26 in a study area on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation, northeast of Arcata, Calif. They plan to remove as many as 118.

The service is spending $3.5 million over six years to remove 3,600 barred owls from sites in Oregon, Washington and California. Barred owls migrated from the East in the 1950s and have become the single biggest threat to spotted owl survival.

Scientists want to see if spotted owls will increase when competition from the more aggressive barred owl is eliminated.

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8 comments

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Xyberman
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 20, 2013
So it is better to spend nearly a $1000 per bird for "specially trained biologists" to go hunting than to charge a hunting enthusiast for a special permit to hunt these birds. By the way, when did it become more sensible to kill one species to protect another?
pepe2907
3.4 / 5 (5) Dec 21, 2013
So, evolution /driven by natural selection/ is not allowed anymore? :)
Sinister1812
not rated yet Dec 21, 2013
Native species can become invasive in new areas too.
Sinister1812
5 / 5 (1) Dec 21, 2013
By the way, when did it become more sensible to kill one species to protect another?


When a species becomes invasive, why shouldn't they take measures to protect local species at risk of extinction?
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 21, 2013
By the way, when did it become more sensible to kill one species to protect another?


When a species becomes invasive, why shouldn't they take measures to protect local species at risk of extinction?

It violates nature.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (6) Dec 21, 2013
By the way, when did it become more sensible to kill one species to protect another?


When a species becomes invasive, why shouldn't they take measures to protect local species at risk of extinction?

It violates nature.
No, we violate nature. Because of our activity, we must assume that the natural state no longer exists anywhere. Evolution is over. The planet therefore must now be managed like a park.

Further, species all have the potential to further our knowledge and provide real benefits in medicine and technology and so should be preserved at all costs.
Doug_Huffman
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 21, 2013
Affirmative Action (or is it A. Reaction?) writ small.
Noumenon
1 / 5 (2) Dec 25, 2013
This sounds like ObamaCare for animals.

So, evolution /driven by natural selection/ is not allowed anymore? :)


If liberals were around during evolution, they would have regulated it as 'unfair', like they view capitalism, and killed off life on the planet, like their mentality threatens to do to economies.

No, we violate nature. Because of our activity, we must assume that the natural state no longer exists anywhere.


Either humans are animals also and who's existence and activity is thus natural as well, or we are not. Which is it?

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