Final checkout for Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory

December 6, 2013
Following arrival in a cleanroom at the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory was attached to a custom-designed satellite mount which allowed the NASA team on-site to perform preliminary inspections and evaluations of the spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Michael Starobin

Following the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory's arrival at the Tangashema Space Center in Japan, efforts by the NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency team will now focus on final checkouts and preparation for launch in early 2014.

After the satellite was removed from its transportation container, the NASA team conducted preliminary inspections and found everything to be in very good shape. None of the systems that monitored the satellite's condition during the move from NASA Goddard to Japan showed any thing outside of normal levels. This means there will be no need to re-test the deployable parts of the observatory.

This month, the number of NASA personnel at the Japanese launch site will increase from the normal staff of 50 to approximately 80-90 in order to allow 24/7 operations during Comprehensive Performance Test (CPT). This activity involves engineers making final preparations to the satellite and verifying that all the elements of the observatory are ready to support mission objectives.

Pre-CPT work this week included testing of both the flight and spare batteries. The spare batteries have been moved into storage and flight ones are now installed on the observatory.

Formal CPT activity is scheduled to begin on next Monday, Dec. 9, 2013 and all scheduled work should be completed in plenty of time for the NASA group to return home for Christmas.

Explore further: NASA's GPM observatory completes first dry run

Related Stories

NASA's GPM observatory completes first dry run

October 18, 2012

(Phys.org)—NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite went through its first complete comprehensive performance test (CPT), beginning on Oct. 4, 2012 at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in ...

Ready, set, space: NASA's GPM satellite begins journey

November 25, 2013

For the past three years, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory has gone from components and assembly drawings to a fully functioning satellite at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. ...

Handover of Japan-built radar to NASA

April 4, 2012

On March 30, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) officially handed off a new satellite instrument to NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) was designed ...

Laser communication mission targets 2017 launch

December 3, 2013

NASA's next laser communication mission recently passed a Preliminary Design Review (PDR), another major milestone towards the launch of the Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) scheduled for 2017.

NASA Flight Opportunities Program launches science payloads

December 2, 2013

An enthusiastic group of suborbital space researchers arrived at Spaceport America in New Mexico in early November to prepare and load their experiments on an UP Aerospace rocket that would place their technologies in a space-like ...

Recommended for you

Hubble catches a transformation in the Virgo constellation

December 9, 2016

The constellation of Virgo (The Virgin) is especially rich in galaxies, due in part to the presence of a massive and gravitationally-bound collection of over 1300 galaxies called the Virgo Cluster. One particular member of ...

Scientists sweep stodgy stature from Saturn's C ring

December 9, 2016

As a cosmic dust magnet, Saturn's C ring gives away its youth. Once thought formed in an older, primordial era, the ring may be but a mere babe – less than 100 million years old, according to Cornell-led astronomers in ...

Khatyrka meteorite found to have third quasicrystal

December 9, 2016

(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has found evidence of a naturally formed quasicrystal in a sample obtained from the Khatyrka meteorite. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.