Avegant plans to show headset with virtual retinal display at CES

Dec 19, 2013 by Nancy Owano weblog

(Phys.org) —Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Avegant on Wednesday announced that a Kickstarter campaign will launch on January 22 on behalf of its product Glyph, a $499 headset. Glyph is also to go on display at the upcoming Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas from January 7 to 10. The shipped version will have one HDMI/MHL cable, and onboard battery power. The Glyph is a headset that integrates video display and audio experiences in a flip-down form factor. The result is a wearable display doubling as a set of headphones. The form factor, however, is not the most notable aspect of the product. CEO Ed Tang explained what he thinks is so special about Glyph, and that is a technology called virtual retinal display.

While the headset looks like another member of the goggles crop breaking on to the digital scene, where users attach some sort of wearable screens to their face, the Glyph stands out as the Glyph projects light directly into your eye. He said the reason why they adopted that concept is because they are actually mimicking natural vision. Images just seem more realistic, vivid, natural and comfortable, unlike watching a cellphone or notebook computer all day, he remarked, "When I put this on," he added, in placing the Glyph on his face, "the amount of depth is incredible….feels like I am looking out a window."

A Virtual Retinal Display uses a micromirror array and combination of optics to reflect an image directly onto the retina; the "screen" becomes the back of the eyeball. The picture comes across as sharp and vivid, and 3D images are exceptionally clear. One of the FAQ listed on the company's site asks, "Is it safe?" Yes, is the given answer. "The light source is simply a low powered Light Emitting Diode (LED) – something like you would see at the end of a keychain light. The micromirror array and optics together create the unique image."

Looking into the device, the user sees an image that appears as an 80-inch screen eight feet away from the user. That translates, according to Avegant, to about a 45-degree field of view.

Tang described his company as a startup intent on bringing out a "portable media platform." According to the company, "Glyph can plug into any HDMI source and display any current content natively. This means sources from an XBox to a Playstation to a MacBook to an iPhone to an Android may be used while content from Blueray DVDs to video games to streaming movies can be watched."

Explore further: Dynamically reconfiguring images with flexible OLED FlexCam (w/ Video)

More information: www.avegant.com/avegant-introd… -display-technology/

Related Stories

Epson's 3-D glasses simulate 80-inch screen

Apr 01, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Epson America is now shipping Android-powered projector glasses that place your favorite videos, or games, literally in your face, Epson’s Moverio BT-100 wearable display glasses can ...

JDI develops a 2.3 inch LCD display packed at 651ppi

Jun 06, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Japan Display Inc. has created a small direct-view display that is packed with so many pixels that it features twice the resolution of the current iPhone 4 with its Retina display. And while ...

Epson packs features into new Android HMD

Nov 14, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new head-mounted display from Epson will let you watch your favorite media content while inside the mall and view your car being towed outside the mall window at the same time. Its new Moverio ...

Recommended for you

Medical advances turn science fiction into science fact

Jul 18, 2014

Exoskeletons helping the paralysed to walk, tiny maggot-inspired devices gnawing at brain tumours, machines working tirelessly as hospital helpers: in many respects, the future of medicine is already here.

User comments : 0