ACLU will appeal NY NSA phone surveillance ruling

Dec 27, 2013 by Larry Neumeister

A civil rights lawyer says the American Civil Liberties Union is very disappointed that a New York judge has found that a government program that collects millions of Americans' telephone records is legal.

Attorney Brett Max Kaufman said the ACLU will appeal Friday's ruling by federal Judge William Pauley in Manhattan. The judge concluded that the program was legal and a valuable part of the nation's efforts to combat the threat of terrorism. The judge said the phone collection program only works because it collects everything.

Kaufman said he hopes a in New York agrees with the reasoning of a Washington D.C. who concluded earlier this month that the program likely violates the Constitution.

Explore further: Judge's word on NSA program won't be the last

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1 / 5 (1) Dec 28, 2013
It doesn't violate the constitution.

The congress has the power to do this and more.

The Federal Government has specific power to not only do this, but regulate all Radio communications, which is why they are the ones who establish who uses what channels. Therefore the Supreme Court will find legal precedent favors the Federal Government regardless of how you view the circumstances.

If they want to, they can ban the use of cell phones outright, or redistribute the rights to different channels to different companies, and fine anyone who violates the new law. They just can't break prior contracts or patents, and can't make an Ex Post Facto law, which simply means they can't punish you for prior "breaks" of a law that didn't exist at the time. However, they can enforce such new law, upon reasonable time for companies to adjust, to the extent of confiscation and imprisonment, the same as any other law.

You don't have as many "rights" as you wrongfully believe you have, nor should you.

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