Watchdog: Google breaching Dutch privacy law

Nov 28, 2013

A privacy watchdog said Thursday that Google has been breaching Dutch law on personal data protection since it introduced a new privacy policy last year.

Jacob Kohnstamm, chairman of the College for the Protection of Personal Data, said that Google's combining of data from different services, including surfing multiple websites, to tailor ads and personalize services like YouTube "spins an invisible web of our personal information, without our permission, and that is outlawed."

In a statement, the watchdog said Google, "does not adequately inform users about the combining of their from all these different services."

It added that consent, required by Dutch law, for the combining of personal data from different Google services "cannot be obtained by accepting general (privacy) terms of service."

Google spokesman Al Verney said the company's "respects European law and allows us to create simpler, more effective services."

Kohnstamm's organization said it has invited Google to a hearing, after which the watchdog will decide on possible enforcement action.

Verney said Google had "engaged fully" with the Dutch investigation and would continue to do so.

The Netherlands is one of six European nations investigating Google's privacy policy along with France, Spain, Germany, Britain and Italy.

Spain's Data Protection Agency said in June that it had initiated sanction proceedings after initial investigations showed Google Spain and Google Inc. may be committing six infractions against the country's law. It said the company could also face fines of up to 300,000 euros ($408,000).

Explore further: France to sanction Google over privacy rules

3.5 /5 (6 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Spain opens privacy case against Google

Jun 20, 2013

Spain launched sanction proceedings against Google Inc. on Thursday for suspected serious breaches of data protection laws, acting just hours after France threatened the group with big fines.

Dutch watchdog: Google WiFi data plan looks okay

Nov 16, 2011

Google Inc.'s plan to let people "opt out" of having their wireless network data used by the company's location services such as StreetView may be clumsy, but the Netherlands' privacy watchdog says it adheres to the letter ...

EU probes new Google privacy policy

Feb 03, 2012

The European Union's data protection authorities have asked Google to delay the rollout of its new privacy policy until they have verified that it doesn't break the bloc's data protection laws.

Recommended for you

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

Apr 18, 2014

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

Apr 18, 2014

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

White House updating online privacy policy

Apr 18, 2014

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

VENDItardE
1.8 / 5 (10) Nov 28, 2013
just another money grab by another broke government
stndspec
not rated yet Nov 29, 2013
It's vital that nations protect citizens' privacy, no question. But over compensation stalls common sense progress. Bottom line - any nations that don't like it can find alternatives to all those Google services as well as Android and YouTube. Have fun with that.
nowhere
1 / 5 (1) Nov 29, 2013
Just another case of a corporation exploiting people, and a government pretending to be able to do something about it.
vlaaing peerd
5 / 5 (2) Nov 29, 2013
just another money grab by another broke government


- I'd hardly call a government of a top-10 richest country in the world 'broke"
- this agency works independently from the government.
- if money is grabbed it would mean the mission to maintain privacy has failed.

How does your government protect your privacy? It seems you and Nowhere have already given up on this human right. Consider the thought that some of those European watchdogs have done more for your privacy protection than your own government.

More news stories

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...

A homemade solar lamp for developing countries

(Phys.org) —The solar lamp developed by the start-up LEDsafari is a more effective, safer, and less expensive form of illumination than the traditional oil lamp currently used by more than one billion people ...

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...