NJ biologists remove arrow from deer's head

November 10, 2013
In an undated photo provided by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, a young male deer stands with a hunter's arrow through it's head, in New Jersey. On Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, New Jersey wildlife officials successfully removed the arrow from the 5-month-old male deer's head while the animal was tranquilized at a wooded private property in Morris County, N.J., The deer was later released into the wild. The biologists who did the procedure say the arrow had not damaged any major arteries or organs and the deer's prognosis for survival is excellent. (AP Photo/New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection)

Wildlife officials have removed an arrow from a young deer's head and released the animal back into the New Jersey woods.

The arrow that had completely pierced the 5-month-old male deer's head was removed Saturday by biologists with the Department of Environmental Protection.

The biologists who did the procedure say the arrow had not damaged any or organs and the deer's prognosis for survival is excellent.

The animal was treated with preventive antibiotics and released back into the wild.

A Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013 photo provided by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, a New Jersey wildlife official shows where a hunter's arrow was successfully removed from a young deer's head while the animal was tranquilized at a wooded private property in Morris County, N.J., The deer was later released t into the wild. The biologists who did the procedure say the arrow had not damaged any major arteries or organs and the deer's prognosis for survival is excellent. (AP Photo/New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection)

In a Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013 photo provided by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, a New Jersey wildlife official shows an hunter's arrow successfully removed from the young deer's head while the animal was tranquilized at a wooded private property in Morris County, N.J., The deer was later released into the wild. The biologists who did the procedure say the arrow had not damaged any major arteries or organs and the deer's prognosis for survival is excellent. (AP Photo/New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection)
DEP spokesman Larry Hajna (HEY'-nah) says the arrow removal was performed at a wooded private property in Rockaway Township, about 25 miles west of New York City. The property owner first spotted the injured deer on November 1.

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Sinister1811
not rated yet Nov 11, 2013
Why wasn't anyone charged?

It happened twice in one week here. A white pelican was shot in the wing/chest with an arrow and had to be euthanized. Someone's pet cat was also shot in the head with arrow (and was lucky to be alive). There's some twisted weirdos out there.

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