Image: Space station deploys Cubesats

Nov 25, 2013
Credit: NASA

Three nanosatellites, known as Cubesats, are deployed from a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Kibo laboratory's robotic arm at 7:10 a.m. (EST) on Nov. 19, 2013.

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, monitored the satellite deployment while operating the Japanese robotic arm from inside Kibo.

The Cubesats were delivered to the International Space Station Aug. 9, aboard Japan's fourth H-II Transfer Vehicle, Kounotori-4.

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antialias_physorg
not rated yet Nov 25, 2013
If that doesn't look like a scenen from Moonraker I don't know...

But it ties in with another story on the frontpage: capture and reuse of satellites.
As satellites get progressively smaller the amount of material one could get back from capturing one will make it less and less worth it. (Refueling to extend missions may be a different issue, though).

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