Iceberg the size of Manhattan could threaten shipping

Nov 14, 2013
This November 10, 2013, MODIS image taken by NASA's Aqua satellite and released November 14, shows an iceberg (C) that was part of the Pine Island Glacier and is now separating from Antarctica.

An iceberg the size of Manhattan has broken off a glacier in Antarctica and could survive long enough to drift into international shipping lanes, scientists said Thursday.

A team led by British scientists has been monitoring the since it broke off the Pine Island Glacier in July in a bid to predict its path and .

"An iceberg that size could survive for a year or longer and it could drift a long way north in that time and end up in the vicinity of world shipping lanes in the Southern Ocean," said Dr Robert Marsh, from the University of Southampton.

"There's a lot of activity to and from the Antarctic Peninsula, and ships could potentially cross paths with this large iceberg, although it would be an unusual coincidence," he said.

Icebergs that large—Manhattan is 33 square miles (87 square kilometres)—break off glaciers on average every two years, the scientists said.

The team's work will help track such drifting behemoths, which are likely to become more common as global warming encourages glacier "calving".

Large icebergs are not only a potential threat to shipping but also have an impact on the environment and could affect ocean currents.

"If these events become more common, there will be a build-up of freshwater which could have lasting effects," said Professor Grant Bigg from the University of Sheffield.

Explore further: Southampton researcher helps to track Manhattan-sized iceberg to prevent shipping disruption

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Egleton
2.8 / 5 (13) Nov 15, 2013
"The team's work will help track such drifting behemoths, which are likely to become more common as global warming encourages glacier "calving".

They put that in there especially for you Nik. Don't dissapoint us.
Sherrin
2.3 / 5 (9) Nov 15, 2013
An Antarctic iceberg as large as ... where? How big is Manhattan? What's the purpose of comparing this iceberg to Manhattan - is it the default unit of measure for icebergs? How did that come about. I would have thought a scientific site would use a measure that was more universally meaningful. Perhaps the next iceberg will be a Hong Kong or a Singapore. Or maybe a Cyprus!!!
Sinister1811
5 / 5 (6) Nov 15, 2013
An Antarctic iceberg as large as ... where? How big is Manhattan?


I get what you're saying (and I understand), but in the article, fifth paragraph it says:

Icebergs that large—Manhattan is 33 square miles (87 square kilometres)—break off glaciers on average every two years, the scientists said.
goracle
2 / 5 (4) Nov 22, 2013
An Antarctic iceberg as large as ... where? How big is Manhattan? What's the purpose of comparing this iceberg to Manhattan - is it the default unit of measure for icebergs? How did that come about. I would have thought a scientific site would use a measure that was more universally meaningful. Perhaps the next iceberg will be a Hong Kong or a Singapore. Or maybe a Cyprus!!!

Perhaps it's a hidden clue that the iceberg is secretly the work of Dr. Manhattan? ;)

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