Germans: European spy agencies swap tech tips

Nov 02, 2013 by Frank Jordans

Germany's foreign intelligence agency confirmed Saturday that it swaps information on the latest technological developments with its European counterparts, but denied a report that it tried to bypass legal restrictions on Internet surveillance to be able to use advanced technology developed by the British.

The London-based Guardian newspaper cited documents released by NSA leaker Edward Snowden according to which Britain's GCHQ spy agency helped their German counterparts to change or bypass domestic laws.

"It is not true that the Federal Intelligence Agency allegedly tried to circumvent legal restrictions in order to use British surveillance technology," said Martin Heinemann, a spokesman for the agency, which is known by its German acronym BND.

Heinemann told The Associated Press that the exchange between the two agencies, which took place in 2008, focused "not on legal, but on technical questions" related to mooted surveillance regulation reforms in Germany that were never implemented.

He acknowledged, though, that the BND swaps tech tips with friendly agencies in Europe.

"A regular exchange of information about technological developments takes place with other European agencies," said Heinemann.

The extent to which Western cooperate on Internet surveillance has come under public scrutiny since Snowden first released documents about the work of the U.S. National Security Agency in June.

This cooperation has been called into question following reports that some of the agencies are spying on friendly nations' leaders.

Earlier this month German weekly Der Spiegel reported that the NSA had monitored Chancellor Angela Merkel's cellphone, prompting her to complain personally to President Barack Obama and send a delegation of senior officials to Washington. Details of the delegation's talks with U.S. officials have been scant. But German media reported Saturday that Berlin is confident it will be able to conclude a "no spy" agreement with Washington.

German weekly Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung cited unnamed German government officials saying such a deal might be reached early next year. Meanwhile, Der Spiegel reported that Germany wants written assurances that U.S. intelligence agencies won't eavesdrop on Merkel anymore.

A German government spokeswoman declined to comment on those reports. The rules of her job did not allow her to be quoted by name.

Explore further: Germany wants 'trust restored' after US spy report

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Germany wants 'trust restored' after US spy report

Jul 01, 2013

The German government wants "trust restored" with the United States following reports that American intelligence agencies bugged European Union offices, and has invited the U.S. ambassador in Berlin to the ...

'NSA eavesdropped on 35 world leaders'

Oct 24, 2013

US spies eavesdropped on the phone conversations of 35 world leaders after White House, Pentagon and State Department officials gave them the numbers, The Guardian reported Thursday.

German spy service plans 'more online surveillance'

Jun 16, 2013

Germany's foreign intelligence service plans a major expansion of Internet surveillance despite deep unease over revelations of US online spying, Der Spiegel news weekly reported on Sunday.

Report: NSA can access most smartphone data

Sep 08, 2013

The U.S. National Security Agency is able to crack protective measures on iPhones, BlackBerry and Android devices, giving it access to users' data on all major smartphones, according to a report Sunday in ...

Thousands in German anti-NSA protest

Sep 08, 2013

Thousands took to the streets in Berlin Saturday in protests against Internet surveillance activities by the US National Security Agency and other intelligence agencies, and the German government's perceived ...

Recommended for you

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

18 hours ago

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

Apr 18, 2014

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

White House updating online privacy policy

Apr 18, 2014

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (1) Nov 02, 2013
As much as the recent developments are dsiquieting it's not a bad thing when agencies from different countries swap tech tips. The more people who know about stuff (bei it allies OR enemies) the less likely it's going to be used...because you only use surveilance techniques that you think no one else knows about.

That said: secrect service agencies must be put on a tight leash and only work within the confines of strict (and transparent) laws. If they don't someone will sooner or later use them as a basis for keeping someone in power in spite of the will of the people (see Russia, China, the US, former East Germany, ...)

More news stories

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Under some LED bulbs whites aren't 'whiter than white'

For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper and fabrics to make whites look "whiter than white," but now, with a switch away from incandescent and fluorescent lighting, different ...