Florida won't repeat public python hunt next year

Nov 18, 2013

Florida won't be repeating a public hunt meant to reduce the population of invasive Burmese pythons in the Everglades.

The state-sponsored Python Challenge attracted roughly 1,600 in January and February and made headlines worldwide. It netted 68 of the snakes, the longest measuring more than 14 feet.

A Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spokeswoman said Monday that the hunt met the agency's primary goal of raising awareness about the python problem, and there will not be another hunt next year.

Instead, the state is beefing up established programs that train licensed hunters and people who regularly work in areas known to contain pythons to kill or report exotic snakes.

Researchers say the snakes, which aren't native to Florida, are eating at an alarming rate and don't have in the state.

Explore further: Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US bans import of Burmese pythons

Jan 17, 2012

The United States announced Tuesday it is banning the import of Burmese pythons and three other species of giant constrictor snakes due to the danger they pose to local wildlife.

Florida bill would ban pythons as pets

Sep 23, 2009

You wouldn't be able to buy a Burmese python as a pet anymore in Florida, under a bill drafted by a state senator who said the state should shut off the source of "dangerous reptiles" that have colonized the Everglades.

Recommended for you

Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat

10 hours ago

Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals. However, a new study indicates ...

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently

13 hours ago

Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behaviour.

Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles

13 hours ago

Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45% on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers. This decline matters because of the enormous ...

Insecticides similar to nicotine widespread in Midwest

14 hours ago

Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new USGS study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid ...

User comments : 0