Facebook to open office near Harvard campus

November 7, 2013

Facebook has announced that it plans to open a Boston-area office in suburban Cambridge, a couple of miles from the Harvard University dorm room where it was founded.

Facebook announced Thursday it plans to build an engineering team in Cambridge. The team will focus on in areas including storage, networking, security, and language runtimes.

Massachusetts House Speaker Robert DeLeo welcomed the news.

The Democrat wrote an open letter in May 2012 to founder Mark Zuckerberg, asking him to return to Massachusetts, where he attended Harvard. DeLeo cited the state's tech-friendly business environment and financial health.

Facebook is headquartered in Menlo Park, California.

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