Three Bengal tigers born at Paraguay zoo

November 12, 2013
A Bengal tiger remains in its cage at the zoo in Asuncion, on November 20, 2012

Three Bengal tigers were born at a zoo in the Paraguay capital Asuncion, its director said Tuesday.

The cute trio, born Friday, weigh between 1 and 1.5 kilos (2.2 to 3.3 pounds) and are doing well, Maris Llorens told reporters.

Their proud parents—Turca and Kachima—were taken in by the last year after they were abandoned by a circus.

The cubs have yet to be named, and Paraguayans have been asked to submit suggestions.

According to Llorens, the birth of Bengal tigers in captivity is rare.

Explore further: Rare Sumatran tiger gives birth to three cubs

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