Australia reveals innovative 'video stamp'

Nov 12, 2013
Illustration: Australia's mail service has developed a high-tech postage stamp which allows the sender of a parcel to deliver a personal video message to its recipient

Australia's mail service has injected technology into the simple postage stamp—creating a "video stamp" to deliver a personal message that recipients can view on their mobile phone.

Australia Post said the Video Stamp, to be distributed for free on some parcel services in the pre-Christmas period, was the world's first to allow users to send a 15-second personalised video along with their packages.

"Christmas is a time when people want to be with their loved ones but more and more friends and family are scattered across the country and around the globe," said Richard Umbers, executive general manager of parcel and express services.

"Australia Post has always helped people connect. This year we are doing more than ever to eliminate the tyranny of distance. The Video Stamp lets you send a little piece of yourself with your gift this Christmas."

The stamp, distributed free with Express Post and Express Courier International products before Christmas since Monday, can be accessed through a smartphone.

To use it, senders scan the stamp, attach it to their parcel and record a personalised greeting using their smartphone and the free Australia Post Video Stamp app within 12 hours of posting.

When the parcel is delivered, the recipient scans the stamp with their phone and it will play the message.

The personalised messages are available for viewing for 90 days after recording, via smartphones and online, and can be shared through social media and email.

Explore further: Review: Apple's iOS 7's hidden gems

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Raunchy Vine videos prompt adult rating

Feb 06, 2013

The propensity for people to post porn evidently prompted Twitter on Wednesday to stamp an adult rating on an updated version of its Vine video-snippet sharing software.

Star Wars' Stamp Put to a Vote

Mar 30, 2007

The United States Postal Service has decided to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Star Wars with a stamp. Which one it is is up to you.

Recommended for you

Oculus unveils new prototype VR headset

12 hours ago

Oculus has unveiled a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. However, the VR company still isn't ready to release a consumer edition.

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

18 hours ago

The interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often remarkably high compared to normal tissues and is thought to impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation ...

Tim Cook puts personal touch on iPhone 6 launch

19 hours ago

Apple chief Tim Cook personally kicked off sales of the iPhone 6, joining in "selfies" and shaking hands with customers Friday outside the company's store near his Silicon Valley home.

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

Sep 19, 2014

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

Sep 19, 2014

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2013
Or you could use an ordinary stamp, and simply write down the URL to the video you've recorded earlier and uploaded to vimeo or youtube or something, because that's what this thing basically is. The QR code is just a weblink.

Milou
1 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2013
Really, Well said Eikka. Australia is way down under. What would one expect? Evolution!!!
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2013
Alternatively, if you want to make it convenient for the recepient who presumably has a smartphone that can read them, you could generate your own QR code and print it on the envelope or postcard. They're not particularily difficult to make.

Two seconds on google gave me this: http://www.qrstuff.com/

Get a sticker sheet and print as many "high tech stamps" as you like.