Australia reveals innovative 'video stamp'

Nov 12, 2013
Illustration: Australia's mail service has developed a high-tech postage stamp which allows the sender of a parcel to deliver a personal video message to its recipient

Australia's mail service has injected technology into the simple postage stamp—creating a "video stamp" to deliver a personal message that recipients can view on their mobile phone.

Australia Post said the Video Stamp, to be distributed for free on some parcel services in the pre-Christmas period, was the world's first to allow users to send a 15-second personalised video along with their packages.

"Christmas is a time when people want to be with their loved ones but more and more friends and family are scattered across the country and around the globe," said Richard Umbers, executive general manager of parcel and express services.

"Australia Post has always helped people connect. This year we are doing more than ever to eliminate the tyranny of distance. The Video Stamp lets you send a little piece of yourself with your gift this Christmas."

The stamp, distributed free with Express Post and Express Courier International products before Christmas since Monday, can be accessed through a smartphone.

To use it, senders scan the stamp, attach it to their parcel and record a personalised greeting using their smartphone and the free Australia Post Video Stamp app within 12 hours of posting.

When the parcel is delivered, the recipient scans the stamp with their phone and it will play the message.

The personalised messages are available for viewing for 90 days after recording, via smartphones and online, and can be shared through social media and email.

Explore further: Better way of checking authenticity of Earth's smallest, most valuable bits of paper

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User comments : 3

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Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2013
Or you could use an ordinary stamp, and simply write down the URL to the video you've recorded earlier and uploaded to vimeo or youtube or something, because that's what this thing basically is. The QR code is just a weblink.

Milou
1 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2013
Really, Well said Eikka. Australia is way down under. What would one expect? Evolution!!!
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2013
Alternatively, if you want to make it convenient for the recepient who presumably has a smartphone that can read them, you could generate your own QR code and print it on the envelope or postcard. They're not particularily difficult to make.

Two seconds on google gave me this: http://www.qrstuff.com/

Get a sticker sheet and print as many "high tech stamps" as you like.

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