US appeals court: Warrants needed for GPS tracking

Nov 03, 2013 by Maryclaire Dale

A U.S. appeals court in Philadelphia has ruled that police can't routinely put GPS devices on vehicles without search warrants.

The ruling last month comes a year after the U.S. Supreme Court said GPS tracking constitutes a police search—but didn't say if police need warrants to use them.

Police put a GPS device under their bumper of three brothers suspected in a series of pharmacy robberies, and soon tracked them to another burglary. They found pills and other property from the pharmacy in the van.

But a federal judge threw out that evidence, and the agreed.

The American Civil Liberties Union says it would be easy for to abuse the practice, because the devices are so cheap. The Justice Department is considering an appeal.

Explore further: White House backs use of body cameras by police

4.5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Judge allows evidence against man in GPS case

Dec 20, 2012

(AP)—A federal judge is allowing prosecutors to use evidence in a drug conspiracy conviction that had been overturned because police used a global positioning system without a warrant.

High court troubled by warrantless GPS tracking (Update)

Nov 08, 2011

The Supreme Court invoked visions of an all-seeing Big Brother and satellites watching us from above. Then things got personal Tuesday when the justices were told police could slap GPS devices on their cars ...

Recommended for you

White House backs use of body cameras by police

17 hours ago

Requiring police officers to wear body cameras is one potential solution for bridging deep mistrust between law enforcement and the public, the White House said, weighing in on a national debate sparked by the shooting of ...

Chinese city creates cellphone sidewalk lane

Sep 15, 2014

Taking a cue from an American TV program, the Chinese city of Chongqing has created a smartphone sidewalk lane, offering a path for those too engrossed in messaging and tweeting to watch where they're going.

Coroner: Bitcoin exchange CEO committed suicide

Sep 15, 2014

A Singapore Coroner's Court has found that the American CEO of a virtual currency exchange committed suicide earlier this year in Singapore because of work and personal issues.

User comments : 0