Unemployment makes women more likely to be victims of crime

Oct 25, 2013

Crime and unemployment are linked, but not always in the ways we think they are.

Thanks to the work of three UK researchers, it's now clear that in some circumstances female unemployment – rather than unemployment as a whole – makes the biggest difference to rates of violent and property crimes.

Writing in the journal Applied Economics, Steve Cook and Duncan Watson (both from the University of Wales Swansea) and Louise Parker (from the University of East Anglia) take a closer look at two ways that unemployment impacts on : the 'opportunity' effect (a strong economy means more goods worth stealing, and fewer people sat at home to guard them) and the 'motivation' effect (a weak economy widens perceived differences between lifestyles and can tempt some into crime).

After crunching data gathered from the US Bureau of Labor and the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Statistics, the team analysed them further for gender effects. Their most important finding was that female unemployment but not male unemployment showed 'significant opportunity effects for aggregate , aggregate property crime and components of violent crime.' In other words, high female unemployment means a higher likelihood of higher crime rates.

Contrary to the expectations of previous studies, the opportunity effects here are counter-cyclical. Their results did not support the traditional 'latchkey' theory that high female employment increases crime because women were working rather than looking after their children.

Their results also did not support the idea that by challenging gender roles, female employment contributes to an increase in crime, especially domestic violence.

Instead, their results supported a 'victimisation' thesis. High levels of female unemployment translate into high numbers of women without the means to escape situations where they are likely to experience crime.

With its innovative approach to examining the relationship between and crime, this study provides an important insight into yet another distressing consequence of a weak economy, for women in particular.

Explore further: Residents feel safer with walkable, retail space

More information: New evidence on the importance of gender and asymmetry in the crime–unemployment relationship, Steve Cook, Duncan Watson & Louise Parker, Applied Economics Volume 46, Issue 2, 2014, DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2013.835481

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Medical marijuana outlets not linked to crime

Jun 06, 2012

Despite some concerns to the contrary, neighborhoods with medical marijuana dispensaries may not have higher crime rates than other neighborhoods—at least in one California city.

Foreclosure crisis and metropolitan crime rates

Aug 17, 2012

The housing foreclosure crisis has been blamed for widespread economic and social problems in the United States, including reduced property values, depressed consumer spending and a decline in government services. Some observers ...

Residents feel safer with walkable, retail space

Oct 08, 2013

The characteristics of walkable neighbourhoods have been explored for their associations with perceived crime risk and fear of crime in Perth's new suburban housing developments.

The reasons behind crime

Oct 11, 2013

More punishment does not necessarily lead to less crime, say researchers at ETH Zurich who have been studying the origins of crime with a computer model. In order to fight crime, more attention should be ...

Recommended for you

When rulers can't understand the ruled

4 hours ago

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America's unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them.

When casualties increased, war coverage became more negative

8 hours ago

As the number of U.S. casualties rose in Afghanistan, reporters filed more stories about the conflict and those articles grew increasingly negative about both the war effort and the military, according to a Penn State researcher. ...

Poll surveys residents of two war-torn African nations

13 hours ago

Researchers fanned out in one of the most dangerous corners of the globe late last year, asking residents of a brutalized part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) their thoughts on violence, security, ...

Drunk driving women treated differently than men

13 hours ago

A study by Victoria University of Wellington's Health Services Research Centre explores attitudes and behaviours surrounding women and drink-driving, and the extent to which they have changed over the past decade.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

OnlineJob
1 / 5 (1) Oct 25, 2013
Job Opportunity - Employment News - Log On: ...onlinefreearnmoney.blogspot.in