With turkeys gone wild, Maine expands hunting

Oct 04, 2013 by Clarke Canfield

Once nearly wiped out of existence, turkeys are running wild.

Buoyed by what's been called the most successful wildlife restoration project ever, are eating crops, ruining gardens, crashing into cars and motorcycles and even smashing through suburban windows.

The unprecedented population spike prompted Maine to expand its turkey-hunting rules, creating a bounty for bird hunters. The fall turkey hunting season began Thursday.

Nonexistent in Maine 26 years ago, the turkey population has increased to an estimated 60,000 . The growth in Maine mirrors what's been happening across North America, with the numbers climbing from about 1 million to 7 million birds in the past 30 years.

Explore further: Wild turkey damage to crops and wildlife mostly exaggerated

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