Scientists uncover mechanism for natural plant immunity

Oct 10, 2013

Scientists in Norwich and China have, for the first time, uncovered exactly how an immune receptor mediating plants' natural immunity to bacteria works.

The research has important implications for developing broad-spectrum disease resistance in .

UK researchers at The Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, in a close collaboration with Chinese scientists at Tsinghua University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing have shared their findings in a paper published this week in Science.

TSL senior scientist Prof. Cyril Zipfel said: "Plants, like humans, have an innate ability to recognise potentially-harmful bacteria and launch an immune response. What we have found is how that complex chemical relationship works."

"This information opens up avenues which will have benefits for worldwide, as it gives us the knowledge to engineer precise resistance in crops."

The researchers uncovered the molecular mechanisms by which a key plant receptor, known as FLS2, recognises the bacterial protein flagellin that is required for bacterial motility. Flagellin binds directly to the FLS2 receptor, leading to the recruitment of a plant co-receptor required for activation.

Prof. Zipfel added: "With rising populations, changing land use and climate change it is increasingly important that our crop production is as efficient as it can be. This research will mean we can develop crops with an enhanced immunity to harmful bacteria which at the moment reduce yield and food quality."

Explore further: Fungi enhances crop roots and could be a future 'bio-fertilizer'

More information: "Structural Basis for flg22-Induced Activation of the Arabidopsis FLS2-BAK1 Immune Complex" Science, 2013.

Related Stories

New defenses deployed against plant diseases

Mar 14, 2010

An international team led by scientists at the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK, have transferred broad spectrum resistance against some important plant diseases across different plant families. This breakthrough ...

Recommended for you

How does a mobile DNA sequence find its target?

8 hours ago

To understand how transposable elements shape genomes, where they are maintained over generations, it is vital to discover the mechanisms behind their targeted integration. Researchers from the Laboratoire ...

Scientists identify protein profiles of DNA repair

May 04, 2015

During each cell division, more than 3.3 billion base pairs of genomic DNA have to be duplicated and segregated accurately to daughter cells. But what happens when the DNA template is damaged in such a way ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.