Publishing in Open Access increases usage and has no effect on book sales

Oct 25, 2013
Publishing in Open Access increases usage and has no effect on book sales

Open Access publishing has no negative effect on book sales, and increases online usage and discovery considerably.

This is one of the conclusions of OAPEN-NL, a project exploring Open Access monograph in the Netherlands. OAPEN-NL's final report, published yesterday, gives recommendations for research funders, libraries, publishers and authors.

OAPEN-NL

OAPEN-NL builds on the European OAPEN-project which was set up to gain experience with Open Access publishing of academic . OAPEN-NL was supported by NWO, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, and the Ministry of OCW via the National PRIMA-subsidy program. The project was conducted by OAPEN Foundation, in collaboration with NWO, SURF and nine academic publishers.

Sales, use and impact of Open Access books

In total 50 academic books were published in Open Access with subsidy from NWO. For every Open Access title, the publishers provided a similar title that was published in the conventional way for comparison. Research showed that publishing in Open Access had no effect whatever on the sale of books. The publisher's fear that book sales would decline if publications would be available in Open Access, was unfounded. However, online usage of books in Open Access increased considerably as did online discovery of these books. Although online usage increased, this did not (yet) lead to an increase of citations in the research timeframe.

The final report contains a large amount of recommendations to improve Open Access for monographs, aimed at all stakeholders in academic book publishing. OAPEN-NL's research report was presented during OAPEN's final seminar 'Open Access for academic books in the Netherlands'.

Costs of Open Access books

OAPEN-NL also gathered data of all 50 books to get an insight in the costs related to publishing academic books. Based on this , publishing a monograph in the Netherlands costs an average of € 12,000. Roughly half of these costs are for the Open Access edition. Remaining costs regard printing and disseminating the paper version. These results are important for the funding of Open Access monographs in the Netherlands.

Explore further: Is open access working?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US backs push for open access textbooks in Arabic

Feb 07, 2013

The United States has backed a project that aims to translate American textbooks into Arabic and make them available without copyrights restrictions to educators and students in the Middle East.

Is open access working?

Oct 24, 2013

According to Peter Suber open access is academic literature which is "digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions". Open access delivered by journals is called "gold" ...

Publisher speeds up e-book access for libraries

Mar 27, 2013

The publisher of Khaled Hosseini, Harlan Coben and other popular authors has decided that it's comfortable with letting libraries offer e-book editions of brand new releases.

Recommended for you

Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

Oct 21, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

How the lotus got its own administration

Oct 21, 2014

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

Oct 21, 2014

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

User comments : 0