Watch live on October 25: Defending Earth from asteroids with Neil Tyson

October 25, 2013

Hundreds of thousands of asteroids orbit the Sun, and a very few have a high risk of striking Earth. But a direct hit can be devastating, as evidenced by the explosion over Chelyabinsk, Russia, this February of a meteor no larger than a small barn, which injured more than 1,000 people.

With current space technology, scientists know how to deflect the majority of hazardous near-Earth objects, but prevention is only possible if nations work together. Learn about the risks and the steps that are being taken to avoid these potential natural disasters from a group of astronauts and cosmonauts who have flown for three different space agencies—and who were instrumental in developing recommendations to the United Nations for defending Earth from .

Neil deGrasse Tyson hosts the discussion, which comes in the same week as the United Nations General Assembly is set to adopt a suite of proposals for creating an international decision-making mechanism for planetary asteroid defense. The Museum and the Association of Space Explorers—a professional society of astronauts and cosmonauts—are cohosting this timely discussion.

Neil deGrasse Tyson hosts the discussion, which will be streamed live right here at amnh.org/live beginning at 11 am EST on October 25.

The discussion takes place the same week the United Nations General Assembly adopts measures creating an international decision-making mechanism for planetary asteroid defense.

Explore further: Russia mulls beacons and the bomb to thwart asteroids

More information: www.amnh.org/live

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