Nobel physics prize announcement delayed

October 8, 2013
Nobel Medals

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has delayed the announcement of this year's Nobel Prize in physics by at least an hour.

That's an unusually long delay by the prize committee, which typically announces its decision right on time or just a few minutes later.

The academy said on Twitter that "The Academy is still in session," but didn't give further details. The members of the academy's physics committee pick the winners in a majority vote on the day of the announcement.

It was supposed to reveal the winners at 11:45 a.m. (0945 GMT; 5:45 a.m. EDT) but delayed the announcement several times, saying it would take place no earlier than 12:45 p.m. (1045 GMT; 6:45 a.m. EDT).

UPDATE: Englert and Higgs win Nobel physics prize

Explore further: Swedish probe into Nobel corruption to close: prosecutor

More information: www.nobelprize.org/

Related Stories

California physicist shares 2011 Nobel Prize

October 4, 2011

Saul Perlmutter won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday, but it wasn't until the California scientist was awakened by a telephone call from a reporter in Sweden that he learned of the distinction.

Nobel chemistry prize to be announced in Stockholm

October 10, 2012

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences will announce the winners of the 2012 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday, capping this year's science awards before the Nobel spotlight moves to literature and peace.

British scientist wins top French prize

September 18, 2013

Margaret Buckingham, a Scottish-born biologist, has been awarded one of France's top science prizes, the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) announced on Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Physicists create first photonic Maxwell's demon

February 12, 2016

(Phys.org)—Maxwell's demon, a hypothetical being that appears to violate the second law of thermodynamics, has been widely studied since it was first proposed in 1867 by James Clerk Maxwell. But most of these studies have ...

Einstein's waves: a 100-year odyssey

February 12, 2016

When Albert Einstein forged the bedrock theory of modern physics 100 years ago, he had no computer, no internet, no printer—ballpoint pens and pocket calculators did not exist and few homes had telephones.

Scientists glimpse Einstein's gravitational waves (Update)

February 11, 2016

In a landmark discovery for physics and astronomy, scientists said Thursday they have glimpsed the first direct evidence of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of space-time that Albert Einstein predicted a century ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.