NASA catches glimpse of the brief life of Southern Indian Ocean's first tropical cyclone

Oct 28, 2013
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone 01S in the South Indian Ocean. The image was taken on Oct. 27 at 09:30 UTC/4:30 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season lasted about one day. Tropical Cyclone 01S was born on Oct. 27 and by Oct. 28 had become a remnant low.

The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean cyclone season formed on Oct. 27 near 13.1 south and 63.4 east, about 570 nautical miles northeast of Port Louis, Mauritus. It was moving to the west-southwest at 7 knots. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots.

On Oct. 27, showed that the low-level circulation center is elongated indicating the system was battling wind shear. Satellite imagery revealed that the strongest convection was around the southern edge of the center. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots/40 mph/64.8 kph and the storm was moving west.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone 01S in the South Indian Ocean. The image was taken on Oct. 27 at 09:30 UTC/4:30 a.m. EDT and showed an elongated storm.

On Oct. 28 at 0000 UTC/Oct. 27 at 8 p.m. EDT, Tropical Cyclone 01S was located near 13.1 south latitude and

62.5 east longitude, approximately 550 nautical miles north-northeast of La Reunion Island. Despite the near 35 knots/40 mph/64.8 kph, the storm was weakening and was expected to weaken because of .

Explore further: Tropical Storm Priscilla's short life

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tropical Storm Priscilla's short life

Oct 17, 2013

Tropical Storm Priscilla lived just 3 days in the eastern Pacific Ocean making for one of the shortest-lived tropical storms of the season.

Extra-Tropical Storm Lekima weakens in Northern Pacific

Oct 28, 2013

Once a typhoon now an extra-tropical cyclone in the far northern Pacific Ocean, Lekima is weakening over cool waters. NASA's Aqua satellite captured the last image of Lekima as a typhoon before it weakened.

Tropical Storm Octave makes landfall in western Mexico

Oct 17, 2013

Tropical Depression 15-E formed on Oct. 12 at 11 p.m. EDT and strengthened into Tropical Storm Octave. Four days later NASA's Terra satellite saw the weakened storm headed for landfall in western Mexico.

Recommended for you

NASA gets two last looks at Tropical Cyclone Jack

17 hours ago

Tropical Cyclone Jack lost its credentials today, April 22, as it no longer qualified as a tropical cyclone. However, before it weakened, NASA's TRMM satellite took a "second look" at the storm yesterday.

Krypton used to accurately date ancient Antarctic ice

Apr 21, 2014

A team of scientists has successfully identified the age of 120,000-year-old Antarctic ice using radiometric krypton dating – a new technique that may allow them to locate and date ice that is more than ...

Taking the pulse of mountain formation in the Andes

Apr 21, 2014

Scientists have long been trying to understand how the Andes and other broad, high-elevation mountain ranges were formed. New research by Carmala Garzione, a professor of earth and environmental sciences ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

60% of China underground water polluted: report

Sixty percent of underground water in China which is officially monitored is too polluted to drink directly, state media have reported, underlining the country's grave environmental problems.

Florida is 'Ground Zero' for sea level rise

Warm sunshine and sandy beaches make south Florida and its crown city, Miami, a haven for tourists, but the area is increasingly endangered by sea level rise, experts said Tuesday.

NASA gets two last looks at Tropical Cyclone Jack

Tropical Cyclone Jack lost its credentials today, April 22, as it no longer qualified as a tropical cyclone. However, before it weakened, NASA's TRMM satellite took a "second look" at the storm yesterday.

In the 'slime jungle' height matters

(Phys.org) —In communities of microbes, akin to 'slime jungles', cells evolve not just to grow faster than their rivals but also to push themselves to the surface of colonies where they gain the best access ...

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

New alfalfa variety resists ravenous local pest

(Phys.org) —Cornell plant breeders have released a new alfalfa variety with some resistance against the alfalfa snout beetle, which has ravaged alfalfa fields in nine northern New York counties and across ...