Hurd tells CNBC that he's happy at Oracle

Oct 22, 2013

Oracle President Mark Hurd says he's not planning on becoming Microsoft's next CEO.

Hurd tells CNBC that he's happy at the business and doesn't expect to be going anywhere.

Microsoft Corp. CEO Steve Ballmer announced in August that he planned to step down as head of the Redmond, Wash., company within the next year.

Hurd's name has been floated as a possible replacement. Other potential candidates include current Ford Motor Co. CEO Alan Mulally.

Hurd told CNBC on Tuesday that he's very happy at Oracle Corp., but didn't deny being contacted by the world's largest software maker.

Hurd joined Redwood City, Calif.-based Oracle in 2010 after being ousted as CEO of Hewlett-Packard Co.

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