An eye-opener: NASA sees Hurricane Raymond reborn for a brief time

October 28, 2013
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Raymond, re-strengthened in the Eastern Pacific. The image was taken on Oct. 27 at 21:15 UTC/5:15 p.m. EDT. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Tropical Storm Raymond moved away from western Mexico and into warmer waters with less wind shear over the weekend of Oct. 26-27, where it strengthened into a hurricane again. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an eye-opening image of Raymond before it ran into strong wind shear.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Raymond that showed its eye had re-developed and opened after it re-strengthened in the Eastern Pacific. The image was taken on Oct. 27 at 21:15 UTC/5:15 p.m. EDT.

By Oct. 28, had again kicked up again and Raymond was weakening. Wind shear increased from the southwest pushing the strongest convection, and showers and thunderstorms northeast of the center.

An infrared, false-colored image of Hurricane Raymond was taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 28 at 9:23 UTC/5:23 a.m. EDT. The AIRS infrared image showed that the strongest storms had been displaced to the northeast of the center as a result of southwesterly wind shear. Those strong storms were still showing cold cloud top temperatures in excess of -63F/-52C indicating they were high in the troposphere and had the potential to generate heavy rain.

This infrared, false-colored image of Hurricane Raymond was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 28 at 9:23 UTC/5:23 a.m. EDT and it showed that the strongest storms (purple) had been displaced to the northeast from wind shear. Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

At 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, Hurricane Raymond's maximum sustained winds were near 85 mph/140 kph and weakening. The center of Hurricane Raymond was near latitude 16.4 north and longitude 117.0 west, about 645 miles/1,035 km southwest of the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California. Raymond was moving toward the north near 7 mph/11 kph and is expected to turn toward the north-northeast. Raymond is forecast to weaken to a late on Oct. 28 and a depression later that day.

The National Hurricane Center noted on Oct. 28 that Raymond is moving into an area with stronger wind shear, cooler and drier air: three factors that will lead to its dissipation in the next couple of days.

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