ESA showcases printed metal parts fit for space

Oct 15, 2013

The European Space Agency says it has developed a technology that allows metal parts for spacecraft and nuclear reactors to be "printed" as a single piece.

In recent years three-dimensional printing has become commonplace in manufacturing. But so far this method has largely been limited to making plastic objects.

ESA says its metal-printing technology can be used to create more complex shapes than with traditional techniques and leaves almost no waste material.

The Paris-based presented several sample objects capable of withstanding temperatures of up to 1,000 degrees Celsius (1,832 Fahrenheit) at an event in London on Tuesday.

It aims to make the parts even more durable in the coming years.

Explore further: Researchers invent smart window that tints and powers itself

4 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers study ways to make stronger materials in 3-D

Sep 18, 2013

(Phys.org) —Aided by funding from NASA and using methods similar to 3-D printing, researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology are running computer simulations of processes that could lead ...

Researchers build 3-D structures out of liquid metal

Jul 09, 2013

(Phys.org) —Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology and techniques to create free-standing structures made of liquid metal at room temperature.

NASA preparing to launch 3-D printer into space (Update)

Sep 29, 2013

NASA is preparing to launch a 3-D printer into space next year, a toaster-sized game changer that greatly reduces the need for astronauts to load up with every tool, spare part or supply they might ever need.

NASA prepares for 3-D manufacturing in space

Jun 03, 2013

(Phys.org) —In preparation for a future where parts and tools can be printed on demand in space, NASA and Made in Space Inc. of Mountain View, Calif., have joined to launch equipment for the the first 3-D microgravity printing ...

Recommended for you

Stanford aims to bring player pianos back to life

12 hours ago

(AP)—Stanford University wants to unlock the secrets of the player piano, which brought recorded music into living rooms long before there were cassettes, compact discs or iPods.

Breakthrough capability keeps subs, ships on safe track

Dec 16, 2014

Interactive software that can dramatically cut the time it takes to plan safe submarine missions is crossing over to the surface fleet and is being installed this month on the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53).

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.