Early stone tool making more sophisticated than originally thought

Oct 28, 2013
Early stone tool making more sophisticated than originally thought
Professor John Gowlett and his team made the discovery at this site in Kilombe, Kenya.

(Phys.org) —Researchers at the University of Liverpool have found that long and slender stone tools were made by human ancestors at least a million years ago – nearly twice as long ago as generally thought.

Materials such as branches, twigs, and stems were readily available to both animal and human tool makers from millions of years ago, but research at Liverpool has now shown that elongate forms were also made out of stone by much earlier than is usually recognised.

Professor John Gowlett, as a member of an international team based on the University's Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, is working at Kilombe in Kenya, where he has found a number of hand axe tools that are very long and narrow.

Professor Gowlett said: "Psychologists have shown that moderately elongate forms are often favoured, especially those in the ratio 0.61. But there also seems to be a special attraction to far longer and slenderer forms.

"Some of the from Kilombe and other early sites are almost two and a half times as long as broad and there is no way this can occur by accident. They must have been carefully crafted.

"Usually such slender shapes are found far later in the fine blade tools made by Homo sapiens. The hand-axes were made by the earlier Homo erectus.

"As the concentrations of elongate tools are rare on the Kilombe site, they were probably made to carry out tasks of animal butchery or plant preparation which did not occur very often.

"They show that when the need arose early humans were capable of strikingly sophisticated behaviour."

The research is published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

Explore further: Language and tool-making skills evolved at same time, study says

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User comments : 4

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verkle
1 / 5 (10) Oct 28, 2013
Tool making came hand-in-hand with the first humans.
Nothing new here.

ACW
3 / 5 (2) Oct 28, 2013
Additionally, to what was said above, even chimps can make tools to survive, at least give early man credit for making decent tools..

http://www.livesc...ies.html
Lurker2358
1 / 5 (10) Oct 28, 2013
Additionally, to what was said above, even chimps can make tools to survive, at least give early man credit for making decent tools..

http://www.livesc...ies.html


Impossible!!!!

Early man needed help from Ancient Aliens in order to do anything more sophisticated than wipe his ass! He even learned to use leaves for that task by watching an Ancient Alien.
Egleton
1 / 5 (5) Oct 28, 2013
Nonsense. She learned how to knap rocks on youtube.