Copper shock: An atomic-scale stress test

Oct 22, 2013
These thin samples of copper, iron and titanium were shocked with optical laser pulses and probed with SLAC's X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Credit: D. Milathianaki, S. Boutet, et al.

(Phys.org) —Scientists used the powerful X-ray laser at the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to create movies detailing trillionths-of-a-second changes in the arrangement of copper atoms after an extreme shock. Movies like these will help researchers create new kinds of materials and test the strength of existing ones.

This work, published Oct. 11 in Science, pinpointed the precise when the extreme pressures began to permanently deform the copper structure, or , so it could no longer bounce back to its original shape. Such experiments provide a direct test of complex computer simulations that model the behavior of many millions of atoms within tiny samples of material.

Such simulations are used to design stronger, more durable materials – such as shielding for satellites to withstand high-speed pelting by space debris – but they have been hard to test in the lab because of the tiny samples and short timescales involved.

"The results enable a number of materials experiments that can be compared to simulations at the same scales," said Despina Milathianaki, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) who led the experiment. "This and future experiments, designed to provide a direct comparison with simulations, will help us to accurately predict the strength of materials in extreme conditions."

Microscope image of resolidification patterns formed on the surface of silicon after the passage of a shock wave. Scientists at LCLS applied optical laser pulses to launch shocks on various materials on a silicon surface, inducing rapid changes in their lattice. The changes unfolding at rates of trillionths of a second apart were unveiled using the ultrabright free electron laser of LCLS. Credit: D. Milathianaki, S. Boutet, et al.

In this experiment, researchers shocked a layer of copper about 1 thousandth of a millimeter, or 1 micron thick with optical laser pulses, and then probed the copper's lattice with ultrabright X-ray pulses. They compiled the X-ray images into atomic-scale movies that detail how the lattice responded at various times after the shock, including the moment the reached its breaking point.

"The demand for research time at LCLS is already at a premium, and these results demonstrate yet another new technique that we believe will open the door to a host of new experiments," said Sebastien Boutet, who leads LCLS's Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Department, where the measurements were performed.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
A sequence of X-ray diffraction images, 10 trillionths of a second apart, shows how a shock impacts the crystal structure, or lattice, of copper at the atomic scale. Credit: D. Milathianaki, S. Boutet, et al./SLAC Multimedia

The same research team – composed mostly of SLAC scientists, with collaborators from University of Oxford, Stanford University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – also shocked other metals, including iron and titanium, and is analyzing the data obtained from those samples.

A diagram of the setup used in the ultrafast shock compression experiment at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), including a large-area CSPAD detector, X-ray and optical lasers, and thin copper samples. Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC

Follow-up research scheduled at LCLS in March seeks to extend the research to additional materials and to enlist other scattering techniques, which may provide more details about the origins of the damage in the lattice.

Explore further: Elastic to plastic: High-energy lasers warp copper—permanently

More information: D. Milathianaki et al., Science, 11 Oct 2013. DOI: 10.1126/science.1239566

Related Stories

Speed limit set for ultrafast electrical switch

Jul 28, 2013

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have clocked the fastest-possible electrical switching in magnetite, a naturally magnetic mineral. Their results ...

Ribosome research takes shape

Aug 29, 2013

In a new state-of-the-art lab at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, components of ribosomes – tiny biological machines that make new proteins and play a vital role in gene expression and antibiotic treatments ...

New X-ray tool proves timing is everything

Feb 20, 2013

(Phys.org)—With SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, timing is everything. Its pulses are designed to explore atomic-scale processes that are measured in femtoseconds, or quadrillionths of a ...

X-ray laser explores new uses for DNA building blocks

Mar 12, 2013

(Phys.org) —The founding father of DNA nanotechnology – a field that forges tiny geometric building blocks from DNA strands – recently came to SLAC to get a new view of these creations using powerful ...

Recommended for you

How to test the twin paradox without using a spaceship

23 hours ago

Forget about anti-ageing creams and hair treatments. If you want to stay young, get a fast spaceship. That is what Einstein's Theory of Relativity predicted a century ago, and it is commonly known as "twin ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Robotics goes micro-scale

(Phys.org) —The development of light-driven 'micro-robots' that can autonomously investigate and manipulate the nano-scale environment in a microscope comes a step closer, thanks to new research from the ...

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...