Researchers invent air conditioning system using ceramic panels

October 17, 2013
Ceramic panels. Credit: UA

Researchers of the University of Alicante belonging to the UA Research Group on Technology and Sustainability in Architecture, along with the Spanish Association of Manufacturers of Ceramic Tiles and Pavements (ASCER) and the Institute for Ceramic Technology (ITC) have developed an innovative thermal conditioning panel of ceramic material, which can control the climate of any room easily, sustainably and energetically efficient.

The main innovation of this new HVAC system is the use of . The panel incorporates a capillary structure by which the water flows on its hidden face and it heats or cools the room in which it is housed according to the water temperature.

This material had not been used so far in combination with a capillary system of water distribution", lecturer Víctor Echarri Iribarren, Director of the UA Research Group on Technology and Sustainability in Architecture explains.

"The system, based on fixed factory assembled panels, is made up of several layers and can be easily installed in ceilings and walls. It requires minimal maintenance and can be deployed across multiple designs and configurations, allowing the creation of panels of different sizes and formats", adds Victor Echarri.

"This innovative form of air conditioning is compatible for use in sustainable construction , as it is environmentally friendly for containing and polypropylene. The system, working with moderate water temperatures, allows the use of renewable solar, geothermal and biomass energy, both in summer and winter. Also, the material provides other advantages such as light weight, easy maintenance and the ability to set custom formats tailored to the needs of the architect", Victor Echarri states.

The technology has been successfully tested and allows systems without , forced or connective air, so it is of interest for ceramic manufacturing companies wishing to develop a line of products based on this technology.

Explore further: Made-to-order materials: Engineers focus on the nano to create strong, lightweight materials

Related Stories

Getting more from groundwater

September 18, 2013

By 2050, around 4 billion people will be living in countries with water shortages. Innovative techniques are urgently needed to squeeze every drop from the resources available, and a team of European scientists believes it ...

Making ceramics that bend without breaking

September 26, 2013

Ceramics are not known for their flexibility: they tend to crack under stress. But researchers from MIT and Singapore have just found a way around that problem—for very tiny objects, at least.

Second life for waste paper in the construction industry

October 3, 2013

Cellulose, the primary ingredient in paper, is a highly efficient insulator and could offer the construction industry an effective, environmentally friendly alternative to convention insulation. However, until now there has ...

Recommended for you

The ethics of robot love

November 25, 2015

There was to have been a conference in Malaysia last week called Love and Sex with Robots but it was cancelled. Malaysian police branded it "illegal" and "ridiculous". "There is nothing scientific about sex with robots," ...

Glider pilots aim for the stratosphere

November 20, 2015

Talk about serendipity. Einar Enevoldson was strolling past a scientist's office in 1991 when he noticed a freshly printed image tacked to the wall. He was thunderstruck; it showed faint particles in the sky that proved something ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.