World's thinnest wireless touch surface (w/ Video)

Sep 04, 2013
World’s thinnest wireless touch surface
World’s thinnest wireless touch surface enabled by CSR’s Bluetooth Smart.

Bluetooth Smart innovator CSR plc has developed the world's thinnest wireless touch interface to demonstrate the revolutionary potential of the technology for computing interfaces. The flexible device, which is less than 0.5 mm thick, turns any area into a touch surface. Combining CSR's low-power wireless technology with the latest in printable, flexible electronics and touch screen sensing, the device can be used to extend the touch interface of tablets and smartphones.

Light weight and flexible, the device can be integrated into a protective cover or used to create large touch zones on a desktop. With minimal weight and bulk, a full keyboard experience can be added to a tablet without taking up valuable screen area. Thin enough to slip behind the pages of a notebook, it can be used to pick up and sketches from the nib of a modified pen.

The paper-thin surface is wirelessly connected using the recently launched CSR1010 chip, part of the CSR µEnergy range, which is optimised solely for Bluetooth Smart. This allows it to connect to the latest iOS7 and Windows 8 PCs using a fraction of the power of standard Bluetooth, enabling market-leading and maintaining the smallest form factor. Touch latency is also minimised to less than 12mS, ensuring near instant visual feedback and enabling a seamless .

"Consumers want innovative, portable wireless accessories that just work with their mobile devices," says Paul Williamson, Director of Low Power Wireless at CSR. "The ultra-thin touch surface we've developed is a perfect example of how Bluetooth Smart can give them just that. We're committed to working collaboratively with developers using the CSR µEnergy platform to help them bring similar next-generation accessories to the market quickly."

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CSR partnered with Atmel and Conductive Inkjet Technology (CIT) to develop the ultra-thin wireless touch surface. The device uses Atmel's touch silicon to sense multiple contact points on a surface, and can offer a full touch surface or power optimised key detection. The flexible membrane is enabled by CIT printed conductors. CIT's reel-to-reel printing process enables copper and other conductors to be applied to the surface of the ultra-thin and flexible membrane, and can be printed to fit a range of tablet shapes and sizes.

CSR's ultra-thin touch surface will be unveiled to customers for the first time at IFA Berlin (Hall 1.2 Stand 104) from 6-11 September 2013.

Explore further: LG introduces world's slimmest full HD LCD panel for smartphones

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User comments : 1

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evropej
not rated yet Sep 04, 2013
I am sure this is really ergonomic. Pounding your fingers on a hard surface all day must the "in" thing to do these days.

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