Visualizing short-range charge transfer at interfaces

Sep 13, 2013
Visualizing short-range charge transfer at interfaces
STM image that provides insight into topography as well as electronic properties; cross-sections of an oxide superlattice where peaks correspond to layers of cuprate superconductor and valleys to metallic manganites (bottom region).

The precise mechanisms governing the relationships between superconductivity and magnetism were examined by using advanced scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the Center for Nanoscale Materials by users from Argonne's Advanced Photon Source working with CNM's Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group. Using cross-sectional STM and spectroscopy together with atomic-resolution electron microscopy, the team developed a clearer picture of the physical and chemical behavior of interfaces between cuprate and manganite layers within a complex-oxide-based superconducting/ferromagnetic material. The results show that the fundamental length sale of the electronic evolution between YBCO and LCMO is confined to the subnanometer range.

Previous measurements of magnetic and electronic properties in superconducting oxide materials relied on aggregate or "bulk" measurements of a large area. Because these materials do not have natural cleavage planes that provide scientists an easy way of looking directly at the interfaces between two dissimilar oxides, the Argonne team developed a way to precisely probe nanoscale features along the edges of the materials. The properties of electrons at such interfaces are not well-understood. When one layer is superconducting and the other is , the researchers needed to ascertain how these two dissimilar phases meet at their boundary. This required sampling the behavior of electrons in the region using especially sensitive STM techniques.

The findings provide a complete and direct microscopic picture of the electronic transition across a YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO) and La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (LCMO) interface, which is an important step towards understanding the competition between ferromagnetism and in complex-oxide heterostructures.

Explore further: Electron spin could be the key to high-temperature superconductivity

More information: Chien et al.,Visualizing short-range charge transfer at the interfaces between ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides, Nature Communications, 4, 2336 (2013). (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3336)

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Minich
not rated yet Sep 13, 2013
"Acknowledgements
Work at Argonne, including the Center for Nanoscale Materials, is supported by the US
Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract
No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The majority of the research at the University of Arkansas
was supported by the grant from the NSF (DMR-0747808) and partially by DOD-ARO
(W911NF-11-1-0200). Work at Cornell is supported by the Army Research Office under
award W911NF0910415, and made use of the Cornell Center for Materials Research
(CCMR) electron microscopy facility supported by the National Science Foundation
Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSEC) program (DMR
1120296)."
It is clear,nothing new, to greate... ZapperZ.
Minich
not rated yet Sep 13, 2013
"Acknowledgements
Work at Argonne, including the Center for Nanoscale Materials, is supported by the US
Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract
No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The majority of the research at the University of Arkansas
was supported by the grant from the NSF (DMR-0747808) and partially by DOD-ARO
(W911NF-11-1-0200). Work at Cornell is supported by the Army Research Office under
award W911NF0910415, and made use of the Cornell Center for Materials Research
(CCMR) electron microscopy facility supported by the National Science Foundation
Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSEC) program (DMR
1120296)."
It is clear,nothing new, to greate... ZapperZ.

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