Team finds new energy storage capabilities between layers of 2-D materials

Sep 26, 2013
This is an SEM of layered MXene along with added illustration of intercalated ions between layers. Credit: Science, M. Lukatskaya, Y. Dall'Agnese, E. Ren, Y. Gogotsi

Drexel University researchers are continuing to expand the capabilities and functionalities of a family of two-dimensional materials they discovered that are as thin as a single atom, but have the potential to store massive amounts of energy. Their latest achievement has pushed the materials storage capacities to new levels while also allowing for their use in flexible devices.

About three years ago, Dr. Michel W. Barsoum and Dr. Yury Gogotsi, professors in Drexel's College of Engineering, discovered atomically thin, two-dimensional materials -similar to - that have good and a surface that is hydrophilic, or can hold liquids. They named these new materials "MXenes," which hearkens to their genesis through the process of etching and exfoliating atomically thin layers of aluminum from layered carbide "MAX phases." The latter also discovered at Drexel about 15 years ago by Barsoum

Since then, the pair, and their team of , have forged ahead in exploring the potential uses of MXenes. Their latest findings are reported in the Sept. 27 issue of Science. In their piece entitled "Cation Intercalation and High Volumetric Capacitance of Two-dimensional Titanium Carbide," Gogotsi and Barsoum along with Drexel researchers Maria Lukatskaya, Olha Mashtalir, Chang Ren, Yohan Dall'Angese and Michael Naugib and Patrick Rozier, Pierre Louis Taberna and Dr. Patrice Simon from Université Paul Sabatier in France, explain how MXenes can accommodate various ions and molecules between their layers by a process known as intercalation.

Intercalation is sometimes a necessary step in order to exploit the unique properties of two-dimensional materials. For example, placing lithium ions between the MXene sheets makes them good candidates for use as in batteries. The fact that MXenes can accommodate ions and molecules in this way is significant because it expands their ability to store energy.

"Currently, eight MXenes have been reported by our team, but there are likely many more that will be discovered - the MXene-and-ion combinations that have been tested to date are by no means an exhaustive demonstration of the material's energy storage capabilities," said Gogotsi, who is also director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute. "So even the impressive capacitances that we are seeing here are probably not the highest possible values to be achieved using MXenes. Intercalation of magnesium and aluminum ions that we observed may also pave the way to development of new kinds of metal ion batteries."

Barsoum and Gogotsi's report looks at intercalation of MXenes with a variety of ions, including lithium, sodium, magnesium, potassium, ammonium and aluminum ions. The resulting materials show high energy and present another avenue of research in this branch of materials science.

"Two-dimensional, titanium carbide MXene electrodes show excellent volumetric super capacitance of up to 350 F/cm3 due to intercalation of cations between its layers," Barsoum said. "This capacity is significantly higher than what is currently possible with porous carbon electrodes. In other words, we can now store more energy in smaller volumes, an important consideration as mobile devices get smaller and require more energy"

The researchers also reported on using MXene "paper" electrodes, instead of conventional rolled powder electrodes with a polymer binder. The flexibility of this paper suggests MXenes may also be useful in flexible and wearable devices, which is another major area of ongoing research at Drexel in collaboration with Professor Genevieve Dion's Shima Seiki Haute Technology Laboratory.

Explore further: Sodium-ion battery cathode has highest energy density to date

More information: "Cation Intercalation and High Volumetric Capacitance of Two-dimensional Titanium Carbide," Science, 2013.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Metals go from strength to strength

22 hours ago

To the human hand, metal feels hard, but at the nanoscale it is surprisingly malleable. Push a lump of metal with brute force through a right-angle mould or die, and while it might look much the same to the ...

Chemists achieve molecular first

23 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Chemists from Trinity College Dublin have achieved a long-pursued molecular first by interlocking three molecules through a single point. Developing interlocked molecules is one of the greatest ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

DonGateley
not rated yet Sep 26, 2013
350 F/cm3 sounds impressive but at what maximum working voltage?
Wraiththe
1 / 5 (1) Sep 27, 2013
How awesome is this! Love this stuff... could read it all day. One thing... Based on what I have been reading here and from other resources, we are getting better at creating circuits and chips that require much less energy and are smaller. I have no doubts we will be seeing autonomous AND remote control - robotic bees, which scares me, and all sorts of amazing things in the near future. I only wish I understood the physics of it all a little better. Also, who gets to use the tech and how?

More news stories

Chemists achieve molecular first

(Phys.org) —Chemists from Trinity College Dublin have achieved a long-pursued molecular first by interlocking three molecules through a single point. Developing interlocked molecules is one of the greatest ...

Metals go from strength to strength

To the human hand, metal feels hard, but at the nanoscale it is surprisingly malleable. Push a lump of metal with brute force through a right-angle mould or die, and while it might look much the same to the ...

ESO image: A study in scarlet

This new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Warm US West, cold East: A 4,000-year pattern

Last winter's curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, ...