Microsoft unveils new Surface, fixes shortcomings (Update 4)

Sep 23, 2013 by Anick Jesdanun
Microsoft's Surface Pro 2 is introduced, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 in New York. The Surface Pro 2, is targeted at professionals who want the full power of a laptop in a tablet-style device. The kickstand built into the device is redesigned to make it easier to use on laps. In the past, it worked best on a flat surface such as a table. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Microsoft refreshed its Surface tablet computers Monday, giving them longer battery life and better comfort on laps as the software giant continues its transformation into a devices and services company.

The company said it tried to address many shortcomings of the first-generation Surface models, sales of which have been slow. Microsoft needs to boost its tablet business to make up for sales declines in traditional desktop and laptop computers. IDC is forecasting a nearly 10 percent decline in PC shipments this year. The research firm also said tablets will outsell traditional PCs in the last three months of the year.

The new tablet models come with a better built-in kickstand so they can rest more firmly on users' laps while they sit on the couch. Microsoft is also making a docking station and a wireless mouse for business customers who need the mobility of tablets but also desire the traditional ways of using computers while in the office.

"We've definitely gotten a year smarter," Brian Hall, general manager of sales and marketing for Surface, said in an interview.

The redesigned Surface tablets come at a time of transition for Microsoft. Earlier this month, Microsoft struck a deal to acquire Nokia's phone and services business for $7.2 billion. The company is also searching for a new CEO to replace Steven A. Ballmer, who announced last month that he plans to retire within the next year.

The Surface Pro 2 is targeted at professionals who want the full power of a laptop in a tablet-style device. With a starting price of $899, the Pro 2 uses a full version of the upcoming Windows 8.1, meaning it can run any program written for Windows desktops and laptops.

The Surface logo is illuminated on a stage prior to the introduction Microsoft's new Surface tablet computer, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 in New York. Microsoft is introducing new Surface tablet computers and accessories, including a professional model that allows people to use it more like a laptop or a desktop. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

The Pro 2 promises 75 percent more battery life than the debut Pro model, which came out in February. Microsoft, which did not specify the number of hours of expected use, said the improvement comes partly from the use of Intel's Haswell chip, which uses less energy. There's also an optional Power Cover accessory that extends battery life even further.

A cheaper model, Surface 2, offers a 25 percent improvement in battery life, which means it can get up to 10 hours of use. It also has a better screen compared with last October's Surface RT. It uses Windows RT 8.1, meaning it can run only apps specifically designed for it. Microsoft said it now has 100,000 apps, or 10 times what was available last year. Like other RT tablets, Microsoft is including a version of its Office software for free with the Surface 2. But now, the package will have the Outlook email and calendar program, not just Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

Panos Panay, corporate vice president of Microsoft, introduces a new Surface tablet, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 in New York. Microsoft is introducing new Surface tablet computers and accessories, including a professional model that allows people to use it more like a laptop or a desktop. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Microsoft is selling the Surface 2 starting at $449 and will continue to offer last year's Surface RT for $349.

The Surface 2 and the Surface Pro 2 will come with 200 gigabytes of free online storage through SkyDrive for two years, as well as free calls and Wi-Fi hotspots through Skype for a year. The new tablets will go on sale Oct. 22, a few days after Microsoft releases its 8.1 update to its Windows 8 operating system on Oct. 17. The screen on both new models remains at 10.6 inches (26.9 centimeters), measured diagonally.

Keyboard covers will cost extra: $120 for a Touch Cover 2, which has working, printed keyboard on the inside surface but whose keys don't move when pushed, and $130 for Type Cover 2, which have keys that move. A new Power Cover with a built-in spare battery will cost about $200 when it comes out early next year.

Panos Panay, corporate vice president of Microsoft, introduces the new Type Cover 2 colors for the Surface tablet, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 in New York. Microsoft is introducing Monday new Surface tablet computers and accessories, including a professional model that allows people to use it more like a laptop or a desktop. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

A $200 docking station also will come out early next year and will work only with Pro models, including the older one already out. Hall said Microsoft chose not to make the Pro 2 smaller so that accessories would be compatible.

In an interview, Hall said the company will fine-tune its marketing strategy by showing specific things that the Surface can do in ads. Last year's ads, he said, tried to create an energetic feeling, but failed to show consumers what the tablets did.

Panos Panay, left, corporate vice president of Microsoft, demonstrates the Skype interface on a Surface tablet, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 in New York. Microsoft is introducing Monday new Surface tablet computers and accessories, including a professional model that allows people to use it more like a laptop or a desktop. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Hall also said Microsoft won't try to compete directly with Apple's popular iPad. Microsoft is positioning the Surface as ideal for tasks people normally tackle on laptops, such as creating documents and editing movies. That's also the reason the Redmond, Washington, company opted not to make models with smaller screens, Hall said, as those tend to be used more for entertainment and content consumption.

Panos Panay, corporate vice president of Microsoft, introduces a Surface 2 tablet with an integrated kickstand, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 in New York. Microsoft says the Pro 2 also offers a 75 percent improvement in battery life over the previous model. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

"We have to get people to think of it as a little different (from) an iPad," he said. "iPads are great, but these are a different device. ... We're building a product for a different set of people."

Explore further: New Surface expected from Microsoft at NYC event (Update)

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evropej
1.4 / 5 (10) Sep 23, 2013
This company has lost its common sense and the demand of the market for this product line. Why would anyone buy a virus prone os for twice the money compared to the finest mature products out there?
Eikka
1 / 5 (1) Sep 23, 2013
Why would anyone buy a virus prone os for twice the money compared to the finest mature products out there?


You might have a case if Windows RT wasn't incompatible with everything, including the viruses. That's why WinRT is just iOS/Android wannabe that nobody wants.

They should just ditch Metro and rework the traditional desktop to be more functional with a touch interface, and rework the touch interface to work better with a traditional desktop paradigm. For example, have a cursor that follows your finger around for more precise pointing and selecting, and click/scroll/rightclick with your second finger at various distances away from the first. Extend the touch sensor slightly outside of the screen area so you can reach every corner.

That would instantly make all the old PC software comfortable on a pad, so the device would instantly have the best software library of all portable computers.
packrat
1 / 5 (7) Sep 23, 2013
I'm still trying to figure out how they justify the prices, especially on that keyboard. You can get quite a nice regular keyboard for under $25 and I only spent $10 for one for my 7" android pad. Microsoft is not Apple (always overpriced on everything) and they are killing themselves pretending to be.
Humpty
1.4 / 5 (9) Sep 23, 2013
Another relaunch of a relaunched, relaunched product, being relaunched, just after relaunchng.

I am so glad I can now buy them by the pallet full for $25 from the scrap yard.

Linux runs quite well on them.

Hands up those who wish that Microsoft and their Tablets would just fuck off and die!
evropej
1 / 5 (8) Sep 24, 2013
Why would anyone buy a virus prone os for twice the money compared to the finest mature products out there?


You might have a case if Windows RT .....


Its the same company producing the same type of code with the same mentality. It doesnt matter if its compatible or not, it be green pastures for malware writers to take root and infect them. Its the Microsoft way.
Eikka
3 / 5 (2) Sep 29, 2013
Its the Microsoft way.


It's the ad-hominem way.

The situation in 2011:
http://www.tomsha...753.html
XPSP3 - 15.9 cases per 1000
W7 64 bit - 2.5 cases per 1000

Again in 2012:
http://www.tomsha...306.html
XPSP3 - 9.5 cases per 1000
W7 64bit - 3.1 cases per 1000

What it means is that Windows virus infections are actually somewhat rare these days, affecting less than 1% of users, and that the security updates are making things better, and that the newer versions of Windows are much harder to infect.
VendicarE
1 / 5 (3) Sep 30, 2013
I like Ball Boy Ballmer's vision of one windows interface, everywhere, and hope that he goes to Ford and implements his vision there so that every car will come equipped with a mandatory unicycle directional control mechanism.

Who needs a freaking steering wheel when there is Ballmer ass control (tm)?
Neinsense99
1.8 / 5 (5) Oct 06, 2013
Its the Microsoft way.


It's the ad-hominem way.

The situation in 2011:
http://www.tomsha...753.html
XPSP3 - 9.5 cases per 1000
W7 64bit - 3.1 cases per 1000

What it means is that Windows virus infections are actually somewhat rare these days, affecting less than 1% of users, and that the security updates are making things better, and that the newer versions of Windows are much harder to infect.

The study is from Microsoft itself.
It only encompasses known infections.
XP is so old that one would expect it to have more and more serious infections.
Again, it's MS with a study of itself.

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