A ray of hope for the 'death-ray' building

Sep 12, 2013

A London skyscraper - nicknamed 'The Walkie Talkie' - which unwittingly projected scorching sunbeams onto the streets below(1) has highlighted the need for city planners to use a more integrated approach being pioneered by a pan-European consortium led by Birmingham City University.

The KIC-Transitions (KIC-T) project(2) will bring together data, modelling and visualisation tools to provide a comprehensive simulation framework that will assist urban strategic planning.

The integrated platform will allow cities to "plug-in" a wide range of information sets for analysis of key environmental impacts, including energy needs, or . The research has been announced to coincide with the British Science Festival.

"Designers behind the Walkie Talkie building have cited climate change and even the lack of as potential reasons for the so-called 'death-ray' effect," said Professor Keith Osman, Director of Research at Birmingham City University.

"This has highlighted just how important our project will be in helping to better assess the impact such ambitious buildings will have when built in real city environments."

Professor Osman said the enhanced modelling capability being developed through KIC-T will allow , designers and city-dwellers to better understand the full implications of planning decisions.

He added: "KIC-T is defining standards and software to allow city data, models and visualisation tools to be readily plugged together, allowing more comprehensive models to be created which can be applied to cities around the world.

"Currently it is often extremely difficult to reuse or combine existing tools to investigate resource consumption, sustainability and assess the environmental impact and quality of life for citizens."

Dave Taylor, KIC-T Project Manager, said: "KIC-T has a real opportunity to make a significant contribution to city modelling and visualisation."

Katharine Fuller, KIC-T Project Director at Birmingham City University, said: "KIC-T will ensure that the results and tools generated by previous, current and future projects within the Climate-KIC can be made accessible to a wider range of users and cities, maximising the benefit of Climate-KIC investment."

Professor Osman added: "KIC-T demonstrates the commitment that Birmingham City University has to the wider sustainability and climate change agenda, and shows how we are able to provide some of the cross-disciplinary expertise required for these challenging topics with global significance."

The KIC-T project team includes Birmingham City University (Coordinator), ETH Zurich, Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research, plus large international companies including ESRI and IBM, small companies like Aria, SBC and Greenhill and the three cities of Birmingham, Rotterdam and Zurich.

The Climate-KIC (http://www.climate-kic.org/) is Europe's largest public-private innovation partnership, working together to address the challenge of . The Climate-KIC is funded by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) which has a wider mission to increase European sustainable growth and competitiveness by reinforcing the innovation capacity of the EU.

Explore further: New tech aims to improve communication between dogs and humans

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Models for a more effective response to climate change

Aug 05, 2013

There is now widespread acceptance that the climate is changing due to human-related greenhouse gas emissions. Climate change will affect all sectors of society and the environment at the local, national ...

Bridging the science-policy communication gap

Sep 10, 2013

While policy decisions can have a huge impact on how people interact with their environment - and science should have a key role here - sound decision-making is based on science. This is not however always ...

Recommended for you

Study says upgrading infrastructure could reduce flood damage

Oct 29, 2014

The severe flooding that devastated a wide swath of Colorado last year might have been less destructive if the bridges, roads and other infrastructure had been upgraded or modernized, according to a new study from the University ...

Walk through buildings from your own device

Oct 29, 2014

Would you like to visit The Frick Collection art museum in New York City but can't find the time? No problem. You can take a 3-D virtual tour that will make you feel like you are there, thanks to Yasutaka ...

'Ambulance drone' prototype unveiled in Holland

Oct 28, 2014

A Dutch-based student on Tuesday unveiled a prototype of an "ambulance drone", a flying defibrillator able to reach heart attack victims within precious life-saving minutes.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Humpty
1 / 5 (4) Sep 13, 2013
I have designed and made solar concentrators - and this is more of an oversight - as the concave concentrator is not a death ray - a small increase in solar concentration will lead to a slow but significantly higher temperature, in the unwitting target - especially if it is the interior of a glass walled oven - such as a vehicle.

It's like shades of gray - there is a difference between standing in the sun and burning a hole through the car....

Without evaluation and testing - off the top of my head, a doubling of the sun strength - will lead to a doubling of the cars interior temperature - which after some time I imagine, will be in the softening range of most automotive furnishing and structural plastics.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.