QUT develops software to reduce greenhouse gases

Sep 25, 2013

Technology developed at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane aims to help Australia reduce greenhouse gas emissions across its agricultural landscape.

Based at the Institute for Future Environments at QUT, Professor Peter Grace coordinates the National Agricultural Nitrous Oxide Research Program (NANORP) which aims to develop strategies to help farmers and other landholders reduce while maintaining productivity levels.

Nitrous oxide is a powerful greenhouse gas, produced mainly in agriculture, and emissions are increasing worldwide.

Professor Grace said the program was the first of its kind to bring together researchers who measure and model N2O emissions from 15 sites around Australia.

"The research involves measuring the produced by from all over Australia as well as the impact various fertilisers, crops and even temperature, rainfall and drought have on ," he said.

He said the value of the research had been boosted by the addition of a purpose built software program developed by QUT including postdoctoral researcher Jason Wimmer.

"The Semaphore program enables researchers around the country to bring their work together into one online interface," Mr Wimmer said.

"The program is an easy to use cloud-based interface to a variety of biochemical modelling tools developed by national and international collaborators which allows researchers to simulate fluxes of carbon and nitrogen and in the environment."

Professor Grace said the software greatly reduces the transaction costs of working with and is a powerful simulation platform for assessing emissions from various land use types and climatic conditions.

"This information is important as it will provide landholders with guidelines to reduce their greenhouse gas footprint and protect their most valuable resource - soil," he said.

"A range of strategies for reducing N2O emissions can be employed including changing the time, type and amount of nitrogen-based fertiliser used, using cover crops, improving irrigation practices and incorporating good manure management," he said.

"Semaphore enables researchers to test greenhouse gas reduction strategies more quickly, reducing the time it takes to do many tests from five days to one."

Explore further: Researchers develop software to reduce greenhouse gases

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Biochar reduces nasty nitrous oxide emissions on farms

Apr 29, 2013

(Phys.org) —In the quest to decrease the world's greenhouse gases, Cornell scientists have discovered that biochar – a charcoal-like substance – reduces the nemesis nitrous oxide from agricultural soil ...

New way to measure nitrous oxide emissions

Mar 06, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- An accurate new way to measure a potent greenhouse gas emitted during agricultural production will help countries to better manage their environmental impact, thanks to Queensland University of Technology ...

Software zeros in on carbon pollution

Jul 26, 2013

Local researchers are developing an online tool that would allow farmers to monitor their greenhouse gas emissions and virtually test ways to reduce carbon pollution.

Greenhouse gases from farmland underestimated

Apr 02, 2013

(Phys.org)—Changes in agricultural practices could reduce soil emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide and the atmospheric pollutant nitric oxide, according to a new study by scientists at the University of California, ...

Recommended for you

NASA image: Signs of deforestation in Brazil

19 hours ago

Multiple fires are visible in in this image of the Para and Mato Grosso states of Brazil. Many of these were most likely intentionally set in order to deforest the land. Deforestation is the removal of a ...

Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life

20 hours ago

The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ...

Is falling recycling rate due to 'green fatigue'?

20 hours ago

It's been suggested that a recent fall in recycling rates is due to green fatigue, caused by the confusing number of recycling bins presented to householders for different materials. Recycling rates woul ...

Study to inform Maryland decision on "fracking"

23 hours ago

The Maryland Department of Environment and Department of Health and Mental Hygiene released on August 18, 2014, a report by the University of Maryland School of Public Health, which assesses the potential ...

User comments : 0