NOAA, government and academia partners deploy underwater robots to improve hurricane science

Sep 25, 2013

A fleet of underwater robots is descending into waters off the east coast to collect data that could help improve storm intensity forecasts during future hurricane seasons. Several regions of the NOAA-led U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) are partnering to deploy 12 to 16 autonomous underwater robotic vehicles, also known as gliders, from Nova Scotia to Georgia.

The gliders will be available through the peak fall Atlantic storm season to collect data on ocean conditions, which will help improve scientists' understanding of hurricanes and pave the way for future improvements in forecasts.

"When storms are moving along our coasts, lives depend on accurate forecasts," said Zdenka Willis, U.S. IOOS program director. "The unmanned gliders will allow us to collect data even in the middle of the storm and eventually provide this information to NOAA's National Weather Service to help improve forecast precision so decision makers can keep people safe."

Scientists will deploy the first gliders in the fleet in early September and continue deploying from different locations throughout the next two to three weeks. Each glider will be deployed for three to eight weeks, collecting data into October.

The underwater gliders can travel thousands of miles and continuously collect and send back ocean data. They can operate for several months at a time and can dive repeatedly to collect three-dimensional ocean observations.

Rutgers University is leading this combined involving all three of the east coast IOOS regions: Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and Southeast. In addition to glider data, the mission will use satellite, moored buoy and coastal . During the mission, the gliders will also collect about fish and mammal migrations to improve the understanding of their behaviors.

Collected glider data will go through NOAA's National Data Buoy Center to NOAA's National Weather Service, the U.S. Navy and other data users for modeling. Data from the glider missions will also be public and available on the IOOS Glider Asset Map and at http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/gliders.php

Explore further: Ocean-sampling robot gliders tracking animals, providing storm data

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Rusty stirs up double trouble surprise

Mar 06, 2013

(Phys.org) —As Tropical Cyclone Rusty crossed the Pilbara coast last week, the ocean's turbidity levels exceeded the maximum range of scientists' instruments.

Underwater gliders may change how scientists track fish

Jun 22, 2010

Tracking fish across Alaska's vast continental shelves can present a challenge to any scientist studying Alaska's seas. Researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have successfully tested a possible ...

Robot gliders roam seas

May 03, 2013

(Phys.org) —Once the robotic gliders scour the ocean searching for potential harm to sea life, the data is sent to David Caron, professor of biological sciences in USC Dornsife, and other marine biologists. ...

Recommended for you

NASA sees Tropical Storm Karina get a boost

12 hours ago

NASA's TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Karina get a boost on August 22 in the form of some moderate rainfall and towering thunderstorms in the center of the storm.

User comments : 0