NASA sees Typhoon Pabuk's veiled eye

Sep 24, 2013 by Rob Gutro
On Sept. 24 at 03:59 UTC the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Typhoon Pabuk's visible eye and very cold (purple) cloud tops and powerful thunderstorms. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

NASA's Aqua satellite orbit around the Earth took it right over Typhoon Pabuk and the image showed an eye veiled with some high clouds.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Pabuk on Sept. 24 at 04:05 UTC as it was nearing Japan. In the image, high clouds draped over Pabuk's eye. Pabuk's eye is about 30 nautical miles/34.5 miles/55.5 km wide, about three times larger than Typhoon Usagi's eye before it made landfall in China earlier in the week.

On Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Pabuk's were near 65 knots/75 mph/120.4 kph and some slight strengthening is expected. Pabuk's center was located near 26.4 north and 139.2 east, about 552 nautical miles/ 635.2 miles/1,022 km south of Yokosuka, Japan. Pabuk is currently moving to the northwest, but is expected to turn to the northeast.

The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Pabuk on Sept. 24 at 04:05 UTC as it was nearing Japan. High clouds drape over Pabuk's eye. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast expects Pabuk to track parallel to the coast of Japan while now staying away from the big island. Pabuk is expected to become an extra-tropical cyclone in the next couple of days and gain frontal characteristics.

Explore further: Infrared NASA image shows strength in Typhoon Pabuk's eastern side

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA sees Usagi become a typhoon

Sep 19, 2013

What was a tropical storm rapidly intensified into Typhoon Usagi within 24 hours as it moves through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA satellite data revealed a 20-mile-wide eye and bands of thunderstorms ...

NASA satellite sees Pewa become a typhoon

Aug 19, 2013

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical cyclone known as Pewa after it strengthened into a typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The Aqua satellite image revealed that Pewa had developed a small ...

Recommended for you

Image: Grand Canyon geology lessons on view

5 hours ago

The Grand Canyon in northern Arizona is a favorite for astronauts shooting photos from the International Space Station, as well as one of the best-known tourist attractions in the world. The steep walls of ...

First radar vision for Copernicus

6 hours ago

Launched on 3 April, ESA's Sentinel-1A satellite has already delivered its first radar images of Earth. They offer a tantalising glimpse of the kind of operational imagery that this new mission will provide ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear energy

Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy industry under intense scrutiny since the Fukushima disaster, the ...

Unraveling the 'black ribbon' around lung cancer

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer?