LinkedIn asks to disclose US security orders

Sep 18, 2013 by Frederic J. Frommer

LinkedIn has asked a secret court to allow it to disclose the number of U.S. national security orders the company has received under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

On Wednesday, LinkedIn joined four other companies that have similar cases pending before the FISA Court. The other four are Google, Microsoft, Yahoo and Facebook.

Among other reasons, LinkedIn said it wanted to disclose the information to address its members' concerns about the privacy and security of their data.

The company said negotiations with the FBI on the issue have reached an impasse.

LinkedIn argued in its motion that it has a right to report the data under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The company asked the FISA Court to hold public oral arguments on its motion.

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