Juniper essential oil characteristics determined

September 4, 2013

Scientists evaluated Rocky Mountain juniper trees for changes in year-round essential oil content and composition. They found that the concentration of essential oil in fresh leaves varied, and that oil content in the male tree was greater than that of the female tree at most sampling points, thus demonstrating that both content and composition of essential oil from Rocky Mountain juniper are subject to seasonal changes and also depend on the sex of the tree.

Throughout the western United States, Canada, and Mexico, Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum Sarg.) is known for its pleasant fragrance and valuable wood. The juniper's wood—highly valued for its durability, rich color, and pleasant aroma—is popular for use as interior paneling, furniture, and fence posts. For centuries, the leaves and berries of Rocky Mountain juniper, which contain strongly aromatic essential , have been used extensively by native people of North America to treat a number of . A recent study evaluated several aspects of variations in essential oil composition and content of the popular tree.

Valtcho D. Zheljazkov and Ekaterina Jeliazkova from the University of Wyoming's Sheridan Research and Extension Center, along with Tess Astatkie of Canada's Dalhousie University, published their research results in the July 2013 issue of HortScience. "We thought that the essential oil content and composition may be different in male and in female trees and also may be affected with throughout the year," Zheljazkov explained. The team evaluated one male and one female Rocky Mountain juniper tree over the course of 1 year. They found that the concentration of essential oil in fresh leaves varied from 0.335% to 0.799%. The team also determined that, at most of the sampling points, the oil content in the of the male tree was greater than that in the biomass of the female tree.

"This study demonstrated that there are seasonal differences in essential and composition within male or female trees. Also, at any given sampling point, the concentration of some oil constituents may be higher in the oil from the female trees, whereas the concentration of other oil constituents may be high in the oil of male trees," Zheljazkov said.

Explore further: Mint oil production moves south

More information: The complete study and abstract are available on the ASHS HortScience electronic journal web site:

Related Stories

Mint oil production moves south

February 24, 2010

Peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) essential oil is a major aromatic agent used extensively in chewing gum, toothpaste, mouth washes, pharmaceuticals, and confectionary and aromatherapy products.

Using wastewater to enhance mint production

March 3, 2011

When essential oils are extracted from plants through the process of steam distillation, wastewater is produced and subsequently released into rivers and streams. Finding new uses for these unused by-products could benefit ...

Tree seeds offer potential for sustainable biofuels

January 9, 2013

Tree seeds, rather than biomass or fuel crop plants, could represent an abundant source of renewable energy, according to research published in the International Journal of Automotive Technology and Management. The study ...

Beneficial tea tree oil given all-clear

March 12, 2013

After two recent reports suggesting that exposing bacteria to tea tree oil may contribute to antibiotic resistance in humans, an international study - led by researchers at The University of Western Australia - has found ...

Recommended for you

Study finds 'rudimentary' empathy in macaques

December 1, 2015

(—A pair of researchers with Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Université Lyon, in France has conducted a study that has shown that macaques have at least some degree of empathy towards their fellow ...

Scientists overcome key CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing hurdle

December 1, 2015

Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT have engineered changes to the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing system that significantly cut down on "off-target" ...

Trap-jaw ants exhibit previously unseen jumping behavior

December 1, 2015

A species of trap-jaw ant has been found to exhibit a previously unseen jumping behavior, using its legs rather than its powerful jaws. The discovery makes this species, Odontomachus rixosus, the only species of ant that ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.