Ex-News of the World reporter charged with hacking

September 3, 2013

Police investigating the British media's phone hacking scandal say a former News of the World journalist has been charged with hacking offenses.

Metropolitan Police said that 37-year-old Daniel Evans was charged Tuesday with conspiring with others to intercept of public figures and other charges, including perverting the course of justice for allegedly making a false witness statement in court.

Evans was arrested in August 2011. He is due to appear at Westminster Magistrates Court on Wednesday.

News of the World, a Rupert Murdoch-owned tabloid, was shuttered after it emerged that its journalists routinely intercepted voicemails of celebrities, royals and crime victims.

The scandal spread to other papers and triggered a police probe into wider media wrongdoing.

Explore further: New arrest in UK phone hacking scandal

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