Endangered species unhurt in Hawaii molasses spill

Sep 19, 2013 by Oskar Garcia

A Hawaii state official in charge of cleaning up the spill of 1,400 tons of molasses in Honolulu Harbor says no endangered species have been hurt in the accident.

Dr. Keith Kawaoka of the Hawaii Department of Health said Wednesday that no endangered species have been identified among the more than 26,000 , shellfish and other marine life that have been collected from nearby waters.

Kawaoka says tested from different points in the harbor and a nearby lagoon have shown improved . He says the water also looks visually better from flyover surveys.

State and federal agencies have been responding since the spill of about 233,000 gallons was discovered last week. Matson Navigation Co. is responsible, and has pledged to pay all costs to clean up.

Explore further: Mass fish kill in Hawaii linked to molasses

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mass fish kill in Hawaii linked to molasses

Sep 16, 2013

Fish began dying off en masse in the waters around Honolulu after hundreds of thousands of gallons of molasses spilled into Honolulu Harbor early this week - and there's nothing officials can do to clean it up.

Tons of dead sardines scooped from Calif. harbor

Mar 14, 2011

(AP) -- Cleaning crews on Sunday finished removing millions of fish found floating dead in a Southern California marina, five days after the slimy, stinking mass of sardines was discovered.

Recommended for you

Sea floor conditions mimicked for drilling platforms

3 hours ago

Mobile jack-up drilling platforms used in the oil and gas industry are at risk of rejection before installation due to their use in harsher environments and deeper waters—but University of WA scientists ...

Drought may take toll on Congo rainforest, study finds

20 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A new analysis of NASA satellite data shows Africa's Congo rainforest, the second-largest tropical rainforest in the world, has undergone a large-scale decline in greenness over the past decade.

User comments : 0

More news stories

How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

About ten years after the first moon landing, scientists on earth made a discovery that proved that our home planet still holds a lot of surprises in store for us. Looking through the portholes of the submersible ...

Sea floor conditions mimicked for drilling platforms

Mobile jack-up drilling platforms used in the oil and gas industry are at risk of rejection before installation due to their use in harsher environments and deeper waters—but University of WA scientists ...

Cell resiliency surprises scientists

New research shows that cells are more resilient in taking care of their DNA than scientists originally thought. Even when missing critical components, cells can adapt and make copies of their DNA in an alternative ...