Venice hosts rare Leonardo drawings exhibition

Aug 28, 2013

Fifty-two drawings by Renaissance genius Leonardo da Vinci are going on show in Venice from Thursday, including the famous but rarely-seen Vitruvian Man charting the ideal proportions of the human body.

The show in the city's Galleria dell'Academia displays works from the museum's own archives as well as from the collections of the British Royal Family, the Ashmolean Museum, the British Museum and the Louvre.

"Leonardo da Vinci: The Universal Man" charts his artistic and scientific research, including on botany, mechanics, optics and warfare as well as preparatory sketches for some of his most famous works.

The Vitruvian Man, from the museum's collection, has not been seen in public in 30 years but is an iconic image seen on T-shirts and posters around the world.

It was based on the writings of the ancient Roman architect Vitruvius, who sought the same proportions of the in nature and used them in building.

The exhibition runs from August 29 to December 1.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) was a polymath who embodied the humanist values of the Renaissance.

Exhibition curator Annalisa Perissa Torriani said the display was intended to give visitors an insight into the inner workings of Leonardo's mind.

It "shows Leonardo reasoning and translating from his brain to his hand but always retracing his steps to add corrections and additions," she said.

Explore further: Best of Last Week – quantum pigeonholing, a hoverbike drone project and the sun goes quiet

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New light on Leonardo Da Vinci's faces

Jul 15, 2010

How did Leonardo Da Vinci manage to paint such perfect faces? For the first time a quantitative chemical analysis has been done on seven paintings from the Louvre Museum (including the Mona Lisa) without extracting ...

Is the Mona Lisa a Self-Portrait?

Jan 25, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Italian scientists hope to dig up the remains of Leonardo da Vinci in order to determine if his most famous painting, the Mona Lisa, is a disguised self-portrait.

Recommended for you

How to win a Tour de France sprint

Jul 22, 2014

The final dash to the line in a Tour de France sprint finish may appear to the bystander to be a mess of bodies trying to cram into the width of a road, but there is a high degree of strategy involved. It ...

User comments : 0