US teens love apps, not tracking

Aug 22, 2013
Teachers and students shoot photos and videos with their smartphones in Mooresville, North Carolina, on June 6, 2013. American teenagers love their smartphone apps, but many are avoiding them, due to fears about privacy and location tracking.

American teenagers love their smartphone apps, but many are avoiding them, due to fears about privacy and location tracking.

A Pew Research Center survey released Thursday found 58 percent of US teens surveyed have downloaded phone or tablet apps, but half of teen apps users have avoided using some due to .

The survey conducted with the Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet and Society found 26 percent of teenage apps users have uninstalled an application because they found out it was collecting personal information they did not want to share.

Nearly half of the apps users have turned off location tracking features on their cell phone or in an app because they were worried about the privacy of their information, Pew found.

"Younger teen apps users ages 12-13 are more likely than older teen apps users 14-17 to say that they have avoided apps over concerns about personal information sharing," the researchers wrote.

"Boys and girls are equally likely to avoid certain apps for these reasons. There are no clear patterns of variation according to the parent's income, or race and ethnicity."

But the survey found girls are considerably more likely than boys—59 to 37 percent—to say they have disabled location tracking features.

According to the researchers, teens may be concerned not only about advertisers and companies tracking them, but their own parents as well. A 2009 Pew survey indicated half of parents of teen cell phone owners said they used the phone to monitor their child's location in some way.

Among American teens, 78 percent have a cell phone and 23 percent of teens have a ; 82 percent own at least one of these mobile devices.

The report was based on a survey of 668 respondents between the ages of 12 and 17 from July 26 to September 30, 2012.

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Stephen_Crowley
1 / 5 (3) Aug 22, 2013
668 respondents. That's not a very big sample
Gmr
1 / 5 (1) Aug 22, 2013
So, teenagers continue to roll the car out of the driveway after sneaking out. Metaphorically.

News at 11!
Hev
not rated yet Aug 22, 2013
Its not just teenagers worried about the unknown collection of personal data - it is also their parents and grand-parents.
Jeweller
3 / 5 (1) Aug 22, 2013
Is it really possible to make a cell phone untraceable ?
I don't think so.
The mere act of turning it on means it has been traced . . . right to your hand.
Humpty
1 / 5 (3) Aug 23, 2013
Yeah as a mildly retarded late adopter of the not so smart phone....

Well the "tracking apps" Ok - so tell me how does a chess type time clock, come to be programmed with location tracking and access to my call logs, or a stop watch / timer function - and it needs full internet connectivity and all the "hello world - here I am" bullshit going on in the back ground - and this is from the fucking Google play store.

OK for driving directions and GPS location - SURE there is a legitimate need to pin point your location and SOME other things - like to keep the phone screen ON etc., but there are so many naziware apps, just for instance, 2 more or less identical programs, one needs to control the phone ringer, and the other one tells world plus dog, everything that is happening on your phone, your calls, you location etc., etc., etc... and it's just a fucking timer - for cooking eggs or running laps etc..

Google is the NSA / CIA nazi fest - just like any other digital crap from the USA.
Humpty
1 / 5 (4) Aug 23, 2013
And what is it with fucking GOOGLE - and their apps - how come so many apps that one ought not need to have internet access / tracking etc., DO have what amounts to spyware on them - Why is there such a plethora of tracking you, logging your phone use and tracking your movements - for things like recipe books, or Pac Man style games, etc...

How come there is so much deceptive software going around? The RIAA does it, the MPAA does it, the CIA / NSA and fucking Google and Microsoft do it....

Tracking and monitoring and spying on users... scanning calls, emails, movements, purchases, who they contacted etc.

Fuck I will be glad when WW 3 breaks out and all these shits get turned into black slag..
alfie_null
2 / 5 (1) Aug 23, 2013
And what is it with fucking GOOGLE - and their apps - how come so many apps that one ought not need to have internet access / tracking etc., DO have what amounts to spyware on them - Why is there such a plethora of tracking you, logging your phone use and tracking your movements - for things like recipe books, or Pac Man style games, etc...


What is it with these stupid rhetorical questions?

You understand Google didn't write those apps? I'm betting most of your apps were "free", weren't they?