Shadows and light: Researchers develop new software to detect forged photos

Aug 05, 2013

Dartmouth and UC Berkeley researchers have developed new software to detect faked photos, using a geometric algorithm to locate inconsistent shadows that are not obvious to the naked eye.

The new method is a significant step in the field of digital forensics, which national security agencies, the media, and others use to differentiate between authentic images and computerized .

The study, titled "Exposing Photo Manipulation with Inconsistent Shadows," was presented last week at the Association for Computing Machinery's SIGGRAPH conference and is to be published in the journal ACM Transactions on Graphics in September.

The new forensic method analyzes a variety of shadows in an image to determine if they are physically consistent with a single illuminating light source. This allows a forensic analyst to determine if a photo is physically plausible or the result of image fakery. This method has, for example, debunked the claims that the lighting and shadows in the famous 1969 photo are fake.

"Our method shifts the dialogue from 'does the lighting/shadow look correct?,' which is well known to be highly unreliable, to a discussion of whether an analyst has correctly selected the location of cast and attached shadows in an image, a far more objective task," says senior author Hany Farid, a professor of computer science and head of the Image Science Group at Dartmouth. "In this regard, our method lets humans do what computers are poor at—understanding scene content—and lets the computer do what humans are poor at—assessing the validity of geometric constraints."

Explore further: Disney researchers reconstruct detailed 3D scenes from hundreds of high-resolution 2D images

More information: www.cs.dartmouth.edu/farid/downloads/publications/tog13/tog13.pdf

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indio007
1 / 5 (2) Aug 06, 2013
All hype.
"This method is intended for use where there is only a single dominant light source. While this limitation does preclude analysis of scenes lit by multiple point lights or diffuse area lighting, it includes the common situation of outdoor scenes lit by the sun or indoor scenes photographed with a flash."

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