Rocket launches from Va. carrying student projects

Aug 13, 2013

A NASA rocket carrying experiments developed by university students from across the nation has been launched from the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital was launched at 6 a.m. Tuesday.

The experiments were developed through the RockSat-X program with the Colorado Space Grant Consortium. Approximately 40 students and instructors were at Wallops to witness the .

Explore further: NASA rocket launch successful, next launch June 24 from Wallops

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