The robot and its virtual twin (w/ Video)

Aug 12, 2013 by Cécilia Carron

It walks, falls, and gets up on his own, follows a ball by sight and shoots. It also knows how to do many other things. The small humanoid robot DARwIn-OP was developed by a Korean company and three U.S. universities to serve as a tool for scientific research. Now, David Mansolino has given it a digital twin. This graduate student integrated it into a simulation platform developed by an EPFL spin-off, Cyberbotics. He also accomplished data transfer from a computer to the robot with a single click.

The first step for the master's thesis was to improve the 's , which is still incomplete, through comparison with the actual robot. This digital twin now serves as a basis to facilitate the learning of new tasks for DARwIn-OP. It possesses not only the robot's appearance, but also its physical and electronic characteristics: a camera, an , a , LEDs and 20 motors whose position is continuously checked and adjusted accordingly.

The user can create his own world and add one or more robots. Environmental parameters are also taken into account. If the small humanoid encounters an obstacle, for example, the robot displayed on the screen will lose its balance, as it would in reality. When it throws a ball, weight and resistance influence the dynamics of the movement. Going through a simulator saves time, since tests can run much faster than in real time. And it also reduces potential damage to the actual robot.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
The work of David Mansolino, a graduate student in microtechnology, makes it possible for a small Korean robot with big eyes that change color to come to life through a virtual platform.

But the work does not stop with simulation. David Mansolino has developed a window that makes it possible – in a single click – to go directly from the simulated task to the robot and to monitor the status of all in real time. He also developed three examples of new abilities in the little robot. Compatible with Robotis, the program provided by the manufacturer of the robot, the new version of Webots which includes the student's contribution is now on the market. It boasts other new features, such as using the keyboard to interact with the robot and the ability to use text-to-speech.

Explore further: Socially-assistive robots help kids with autism learn by providing personalized prompts

More information: www.cyberbotics.com/

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

DARPA's ATLAS robot unveiled (w/ Video)

Jul 11, 2013

On Monday, July 8, 2013, the seven teams that progressed from DARPA's Virtual Robotics Challenge (VRC) arrived at the headquarters of Boston Dynamics in Waltham, Mass. to meet and learn about their new teammate, ...

Humanoid robot that sees and maps

Jul 02, 2013

(Phys.org) —Computer vision algorithms that enable Samsung's latest humanoid robot, Roboray, to build real-time 3D visual maps to move around more efficiently have been developed by researchers from the ...

A robot that runs like a cat (w/ Video)

Jun 17, 2013

Thanks to its legs, whose design faithfully reproduces feline morphology, EPFL's 4-legged 'cheetah-cub robot' has the same advantages as its model: It is small, light and fast.

German team creates robot ape (w/ Video)

Jun 25, 2013

(Phys.org) —Researchers at Germany's Research Center for Artificial Intelligence are working on a project they call iStruct—its purpose is to create robots that more closely resemble their natural counterparts. ...

Recommended for you

Robots lending a helping hand to build planes

Aug 26, 2014

Trying to squeeze into small enclosed areas, carrying out highly repetitive tasks, retiring with back injuries even while your expertise is needed: these everyday realities of working in aviation construction ...

C2D2 fighting corrosion

Aug 22, 2014

Bridges become an infrastructure problem as they get older, as de-icing salt and carbon dioxide gradually destroy the reinforced concrete. A new robot can now check the condition of these structures, even ...

Meet the "swarmies"- robotics' answer to bugs

Aug 22, 2014

(Phys.org) —A small band of NASA engineers and interns is about to begin testing a group of robots and related software that will show whether it's possible for autonomous machines to scurry about an alien ...

User comments : 0