Researchers re-evaluate swine nutrition

Aug 05, 2013

For a new study in the Journal of Animal Science, researchers evaluated how different concentrations of lipids affect growth performance in weaned pigs. The researchers also studied how different sources of lipids affect pigs.

According to the researchers, it is important to re-evaluate energy density and because swine genetics have improved over the years.

Dr. Olayiwola Adeola, animal science professor at Purdue University, said small have an issue with intestinal capacity to consume enough energy. This means that the intestines cannot absorb as much nutrients as pigs in other stages of growth. Adeola and his colleagues wanted determine whether to increase the different concentration of lipids or use different sources.

The growth performance study was conducted at nine different research stations across the United States. Researchers studied a total of 822 crossbred pigs for 35 days. The days were divided into three phases.

In these three phases, researchers studied the growth performance effects of feeds containing different percentage levels of a plant and animal source of lipids. The researchers used tallow as the animal source and soybean oil as the plant source of lipids.

During each phase, researchers decreased the amount of animal products like dried whey and fishmeal. Adeola said the feed in phase one was a transition from milk to dry diets after weaning. During phase two, the feed was not as "high-powered" as the feed from phase one because the researchers reduced the type of nutrients normally in milk. The feed from phase three had an increase in plant products. This feed was similar to grow/finish feed that the pigs would consume in later stages of growth.

The researchers weighed the pigs at the beginning and end of each phase and calculated the average daily gain, average daily feed intake and the feed efficiency of the pigs.

Adeola said the results showed that the plant source was more efficient than the animal source. He said the concentration of energy source in is important to improve growth performance. He said lipids are a concentrated energy source compared with carbohydrates and proteins. He said this study supports the values of energy for in the 2012 Swine NRC.

"If we were to use concentrated energy sources, it might be very helpful in counteracting some of the issues that limit growth of nursery pigs," Adeola said in an interview.

Explore further: 'Divide and rule'—raven politics

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Finding ways to feed pigs for less

Jun 07, 2012

Results of a preliminary experiment conducted at the University of Illinois indicate that it may be possible to select pigs that can make efficient use of energy in less expensive feed ingredients, thus reducing diet costs.

Feeding corn germ to pigs does not affect growth performance

Apr 01, 2013

Inclusion of corn germ in swine diets can reduce diet costs, depending on the local cost of corn germ and other ingredients. Recent research conducted at the University of Illinois indicates that corn germ can be included ...

Recommended for you

'Divide and rule'—raven politics

1 hour ago

Mythology has attributed many supernatural features to ravens. Studies on the cognitive abilities of ravens have indeed revealed that they are exceptionally intelligent. Ravens live in complex social groups ...

Science casts light on sex in the orchard

21 hours ago

Persimmons are among the small club of plants with separate sexes—individual trees are either male or female. Now scientists at the University of California, Davis, and Kyoto University in Japan have discovered ...

Four new dragon millipedes found in China

22 hours ago

A team of speleobiologists from the South China Agriculture University and the Russian Academy of Sciences have described four new species of the dragon millipedes from southern China, two of which seem to ...

Scientist creates automatic birdsong recognition app

Oct 30, 2014

Dr Dan Stowell, an EPSRC Research Fellow in QMUL's School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has used a grant from Queen Mary Innovation to develop a prototype for an app that turns his research ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.