Researchers re-evaluate swine nutrition

Aug 05, 2013

For a new study in the Journal of Animal Science, researchers evaluated how different concentrations of lipids affect growth performance in weaned pigs. The researchers also studied how different sources of lipids affect pigs.

According to the researchers, it is important to re-evaluate energy density and because swine genetics have improved over the years.

Dr. Olayiwola Adeola, animal science professor at Purdue University, said small have an issue with intestinal capacity to consume enough energy. This means that the intestines cannot absorb as much nutrients as pigs in other stages of growth. Adeola and his colleagues wanted determine whether to increase the different concentration of lipids or use different sources.

The growth performance study was conducted at nine different research stations across the United States. Researchers studied a total of 822 crossbred pigs for 35 days. The days were divided into three phases.

In these three phases, researchers studied the growth performance effects of feeds containing different percentage levels of a plant and animal source of lipids. The researchers used tallow as the animal source and soybean oil as the plant source of lipids.

During each phase, researchers decreased the amount of animal products like dried whey and fishmeal. Adeola said the feed in phase one was a transition from milk to dry diets after weaning. During phase two, the feed was not as "high-powered" as the feed from phase one because the researchers reduced the type of nutrients normally in milk. The feed from phase three had an increase in plant products. This feed was similar to grow/finish feed that the pigs would consume in later stages of growth.

The researchers weighed the pigs at the beginning and end of each phase and calculated the average daily gain, average daily feed intake and the feed efficiency of the pigs.

Adeola said the results showed that the plant source was more efficient than the animal source. He said the concentration of energy source in is important to improve growth performance. He said lipids are a concentrated energy source compared with carbohydrates and proteins. He said this study supports the values of energy for in the 2012 Swine NRC.

"If we were to use concentrated energy sources, it might be very helpful in counteracting some of the issues that limit growth of nursery pigs," Adeola said in an interview.

Explore further: Insect mating behavior has lessons for drones

Related Stories

Finding ways to feed pigs for less

Jun 07, 2012

Results of a preliminary experiment conducted at the University of Illinois indicate that it may be possible to select pigs that can make efficient use of energy in less expensive feed ingredients, thus reducing diet costs.

Feeding corn germ to pigs does not affect growth performance

Apr 01, 2013

Inclusion of corn germ in swine diets can reduce diet costs, depending on the local cost of corn germ and other ingredients. Recent research conducted at the University of Illinois indicates that corn germ can be included ...

Recommended for you

Insect mating behavior has lessons for drones

9 hours ago

Male moths locate females by navigating along the latter's pheromone (odor) plume, often flying hundreds of meters to do so. Two strategies are involved to accomplish this: males must find the outer envelope ...

Godwits are flexible... when they get the chance

May 29, 2015

Black-tailed godwits are able to cope with unpredictable weather. This was revealed by a thorough analysis of the extraordinary spring of 2013 by ecologist Nathan Senner of the University of Groningen and ...

Do you have the time? Flies sure do

May 28, 2015

Flies might be smarter than you think. According to research reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 28, fruit flies know what time of day it is. What's more, the insects can learn to con ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.