Planting a new perspective on climate research

Aug 02, 2013
Planting a new perspective on climate research
Stony Brook’s Alison Liu examines mature seed production in an Arabidopsis plant.

(Phys.org) —A study on the mechanisms of how plants respond and adapt to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and higher temperatures has opened a new perspective in climate research. Lead researcher Qiong A. Liu (Alison) of the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology at Stony Brook University found that elevatedC02 and higher temperatures affect the aspect of gene expression in plants that control flowering time and cell proliferation.

The results of the study, "The Effects of Carbon Dioxide and Temperature on microRNA Expression in Arabidopsis Development," are published July 31 in the online journal Nature Communications.

Elevated C02 levels in the atmosphere have enhanced the and resulted in —and continued climate change within this century is inevitable. But how do these changes impact plants on a ? To discover the answer, Liu focused on examining the impact that increased levels of C02 and increased temperature, each separately had on small RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana, small that only need about six weeks to go from germination to seed maturation.

Small RNAs are important regulators of gene expression in nearly all eukaryotes —organisms whose cells contain a nucleus and other structures within membranes. Their expressions can be altered in response to environmental stress. MicroRNAs (or miRNAs) belong to one of two types of small RNAs that function to silence the expression of their regulated . Therefore, increased levels of miRNAs can reduce their target gene expression, and vice versa. Since miRNA target genes are often important regulators in specific biological pathways, the identification of miRNAs that are changed in expression by , such as elevated CO2 concentration and temperature, can enable scientists to identify the biological pathways that are involved in regulating plant in response to a changing environment.

"This is the first small RNA paper in the area of climate change," Liu says. "CO2 has never been shown previously to regulate small RNA expression, and temperature-related small RNAs studies have been done previously, but only at freezing or low temperatures (the optimum temperature for Arabidopsis is at 23oC). We found that a 3-6oC increase in temperature from optimum temperature regulates a different set of miRNAs from other temperature-regulated miRNAs, but nearly all miRNAs affected by doubling the atmospheric CO2 concentration in an opposite direction."

Using the next generation of sequencing in combination with statistical and computational analyses, Liu and her research team provided the first genome-wide profiling that demonstrated that increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperatures within the ranges that will occur within this century can alter the expression of four functional groups of miRNAs: controlling , cell division and proliferation, stress responses, and potentially cell wall carbohydrate synthesis.

"These results indicate that under global warming conditions, plant grain and biomass production can be changed through altering the expression of these miRNAs," Liu explains. "Given that nearly all of these miRNAs are conserved across multiple species, identification of these miRNAs provide us a starting ground to improve plant yields, particularly those that are economically important, to meet the upcoming challenges of global warming."

Liu adds that one pathway, a miRNA (miR156)-regulated pathway, was identified to most likely mediate elevated CO2 concentration-induced early flowering. This result was obtained independently from other three relevant studies published at the same time in the journal Science and Elife, which demonstrated that sugar, the primary product of photosynthesis,can also regulate this pathway.

The study findings also raise other questions. Liu hopes to answer these questions by advancing the research.

"So far, we have only tested one concentration of CO2, and 3 to 6oC changes of temperature. We hope to get the data in a gradient of CO2 and temperature conditions. In addition, we also will be interested in understanding how these conditions affect miRNA expression in several other tissues—root, shoot, and flower tissues, for example, at different developmental stages," she says. "In addition, further genetic investigation on identified miRNAs individually will shed new light on how their regulated pathways function in adaption to climate change."

The researcher is now testing how combined conditions of elevated CO2 concentration and elevated temperature affect miRNAs expression. These are important experiments, she says, given that these two conditions are known to affect several miRNAs expression in the opposite directions. It is also practically more meaningful as climate change really has both CO2 concentration and temperature increases at the same time.

Liu is also preparing a manuscript that is related to how elevated CO2 concentration affects the genomic DNA methylation, which is another regulatory mechanism to regulate gene expression and genome stability.

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plaasjaapie
1.8 / 5 (5) Aug 02, 2013
""So far, we have only tested one concentration of CO2, and 3 to 6oC changes of temperature. We hope to get the data in a gradient of CO2 and temperature conditions. In addition, we also will be interested in understanding how these conditions affect miRNA expression in several other tissues—root, shoot, and flower tissues, for example, at different developmental stages," she says. "In addition, further genetic investigation on identified miRNAs individually will shed new light on how their regulated pathways function in adaption to climate change."

A rather obvious rush to publish.
NikFromNYC
1.7 / 5 (6) Aug 02, 2013
When your friends and family die in hospitals due to lack of new antibiotics and unemployed hard science graduates, remember how each postdoc year assigned to the fairy tail that recent warming isn't perfectly natural plus a trivial CO2 enhancement, each million dollar grant, each advanced genetics research instrument that has been churning out propaganda for Al Gore, those resources were stolen from medical research budgets via political activism of those who are heavily invested in green banking schemes pioneered by Enron.