NASA image: Rim Fire update Aug. 29, 2013

Aug 29, 2013
Slowly but surely, the Rim Fire in California is being contained. Currently it is 30% contained. The fire has burned over 192,000 acres. The use of aircraft and water/chemical dumping on the fire has been instrumental in slowing/stopping blazes. Credit: NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team, GSFC.

Slowly but surely, the Rim Fire in California is being contained. Currently it is 30% contained. The fire has burned over 192,000 acres. The use of aircraft and water/chemical dumping on the fire has been instrumental in slowing/stopping blazes.

The update as of Aug. 29 from Inciweb.org is as follows: "Firefighters used aerial ignitions today to burnout Pilot Ridge on the southern portion of the fire. The burnout planned from Hetch Hetchy Reservoir south to Tioga Road in Yosemite National Park did not occur. Conditions were not conducive to lighting and containing the fire. Firefighters continue to provide structure defense and improve firelines. The California National Guard is operating a remotely piloted aircraft to help efforts to contain the fire. It will identify where is located, how it is moving, including locating and identifying spot fires. It will improve the ability to protect life property and natural resources. The Tuolumne County Sherriff's Office has lifted the evacuation order and PG&E has restored power to Graham Ranch Road, allowing residents only to return home. Tonight, crews will continue with burning operations as long as weather conditions allow, and will construct and improve firelines."

Still the remote terrain, weather, and extreme fire behavior, hamper efforts to completely suppress the Rim Fire. Large burnout operations are planned for the southeastern edge of the fire in Yosemite National Park.

This natural-color satellite image was collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite on August 28, 2013. Actively burning areas, detected by MODIS's thermal bands, are outlined in red.

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